Speak With Me: English Speaking Practice

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2022-03-18・ 13923

Speak English With Vanessa channel


Are you ready to speak with me? Let's get some English speaking practice! Download the free PDF worksheet for this lesson here: http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com/free Download my free e-book: "5 Steps To Becoming A Confident English Speaker" http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com/free-ebook --------------------------------------------------------------------- English book recommendations: https://www.amazon.com/shop/speakenglishwithvanessa Subscribe and follow on social media! I'd love to meet you! YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=theteachervanessa Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/englishwithvanessa/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/speakenglishwithvanessa Send us a postcard from your country: Speak English With Vanessa 825 C Merrimon Ave PMB # 278 Asheville, NC 28804 USA --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speak English With Vanessa helps English learners to speak American English fluently, naturally, and confidently. To become a fluent English speaker and have English conversations with a native English speaker, go to http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com

Instruction

Double-click on the English captions to play the video from there.

00:00
Hi, I'm Vanessa from  SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com. Oh, I  
00:05
don't feel so great. Could you  help me? Let's talk about it. 
00:14
Let's imagine this situation. You are visiting the  US, you're walking down the street and you see me,  
00:21
but when you see me, I look like this. I don't  look so great. Do you know what to say to me?  
00:30
Could you help me in this situation? Well,  never fear. Today I'm going to help you  
00:35
learn how to speak about feeling sick and also  help other people when they're feeling sick. 
00:42
We're going to talk about some common questions to  ask when someone is sick and some common questions  
00:47
someone might ask you when you're sick. Some  common vocabulary that you can use and also we'll  
00:52
have a sample conversation between my husband  Dan and I. You'll see how to talk about this  
00:58
and then it will be your turn. You'll have the  chance to speak with me and talk about feeling  
01:04
sick. I hope this will boost your confidence and  give you the tools that you need so that when you  
01:09
use this in real life, you will feel ready to go. All right, let's get started. To help you never  
01:14
forget what you are about to learn  in this lesson, I have created a free  
01:19
PDF worksheet that you can download all of today's  questions, vocabularies and sample sentences plus,  
01:26
you can answer Vanessa's challenge question at the  bottom of the worksheet. This free PDF is a gift  
01:32
to you to help you review and remember everything  that you've learned. You can click on the link in  
01:38
the description to download this free PDF today. All right. Let's get started with some common  
01:43
questions about health and when you're  feeling sick. Do you feel okay or are  
01:49
you feeling okay? You don't look so good, do you  feel okay? I saw you fall, are you feeling okay?  
01:56
These are great introduction questions when you  suspect that someone is not feeling their best. 
02:03
Where does it hurt? I use this question a lot  with my sons when they fall or get hurt and I  
02:08
see their crying. After helping them emotionally  for a moment, I often ask them, where does it  
02:14
hurt? Is it your arm, your leg, your stomach, your  head? Where does it hurt? Do you want to sit down?  
02:21
Do you want to lie down? If you saw me walking  around the streets not looking so great, this  
02:27
would be a great question to ask me. Hey, Vanessa,  I'm glad to meet you, but you don't look so great.  
02:33
Are you feeling okay? Do you want to sit down?  Here's a bench. Oh, I would feel so taken care of. 
02:40
Have you taken anything for it? If I told you that  I had a headache, you could ask me this question.  
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Have you taken anything for it? It means have  you taken any medicine yet. Can you stand?  
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Can you wiggle your fingers? Can you  walk? This is sometimes an assessment  
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that a doctor or maybe a parent would use. When I was a kid, my parents said this to me  
03:03
and I say it to my children as well. It's a good  way to see if they're capable of doing something,  
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but I think it also helps your child feel like,  oh, I can wiggle my finger, I'm okay. It's not too  
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serious. Can I bring you anything? This is lovely,  you're offering to help. Can I bring you anything?  
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Maybe some hot tea. Maybe a hot pad to put  on your back because it hurts. Maybe a chair  
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so you can sit down. Can I bring you anything? Our final question is one that the sick person  
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can ask. Do I feel hot to you? Maybe if you're  feeling a fever coming on or you're just not  
03:40
feeling that great and if you don't have access to  a thermometer nearby, you might ask someone, do I  
03:47
feel hot to you? They'll probably put their hand  on your forehead either like this or like this and  
03:53
assess roughly if you feel hot which means you  probably have a fever and you're not feeling well. 
04:00
All right, let's talk about some  common phrases that you might use  
04:04
when you're sick. I feel dizzy. Oh, those flashing  lights are making me feel dizzy. I feel woozy. I  
04:14
had the stomach flu last week and this week I'm  still feeling woozy. It's just similar to dizzy,  
04:21
but it also means that maybe your stomach doesn't  feel well too. I feel nauseous. This means  
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you feel like you're going to throw up. I took  some medicine without eating any food and ugh,  
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now I feel nauseous. Notice the pronunciation  here. The S in the middle sounds like ssh,  
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nauseous. Nauseous, I hope you don't feel  nauseous. I feel achy. It's kind of continuous  
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dull pain, especially if you've been sick  or you have a fever and you're in bed,  
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you probably are going to feel just achy all over. I feel clammy. Usually we use this for our hands  
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when they're wet or sweaty, but it's kind  of cold. I feel clammy. It doesn't feel  
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great. I feel fatigued or lethargic and this  means you feel really tired. It kind of feels  
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like you're swimming through the air. I just  can't do anything quickly, I feel lethargic. 
05:20
Some general expressions about how you feel.  You might say, I feel a bit under the weather.  
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That means you're not feeling well. I feel a  little bit under the weather or just I feel  
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under the weather today. I think I'm going  to cancel our get together. I feel under the  
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weather. I don't feel so hot. This means I don't  feel well. Ironically, maybe you have fever and  
05:42
you actually are hot, but overall, it just means  I don't feel well. I don't feel so hot today. 
05:48
Or you might say, I think I'm coming down with  something. To come down with something means that  
05:54
you're getting sick. You're getting a virus or  you're just getting some kind of sickness. I think  
06:00
I'm coming down with something. It's probably  better for me not to go to the party today.  
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If someone else is sick, you can always tell them  get well soon or I hope you feel better soon.  
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Both of these phrases are very kind and  it can help to express that you care.  
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Get well soon or I hope you feel better soon. All right, now we're going to go through some  
06:21
vocabulary of some common problems or some common  sicknesses that you might experience. I have a  
06:28
headache, can you please turn that loud music  off? If you have a fever, you should probably stay  
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home. I fell and hit my head and now I have some  blurred vision. I should probably call the doctor.  
06:43
A bee stung me on my finger and now I have  swelling all over my finger. I think I need  
06:52
to take something, I might be allergic. I always  have a stuffy nose or I always have congestion  
07:00
in the springtime. Right now when all of the  flowers are blooming, I always have a stuffy nose. 
07:07
I was sick last month and now I feel  better, but I still have a little cough.  
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I still have a little cough. I don't know what  it's like in your country, but here in the US,  
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if you have a little cough and you know that you  don't have COVID, but if you cough in public,  
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everyone says, oh, and they feel a little bit  nervous that maybe you're coughing because of  
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COVID. In reality, there are many reasons why  someone might cough, but it's still in our  
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minds and we're still a little worried about it. I have a sore throat and it hurts to talk today.  
07:45
I have a muscle cramp in my leg and it hurts  to walk. A muscle cramp. Notice that the c  
07:54
in the word muscle is silent. Do not say  mus-cle. Instead, it's just muscle. My  
08:02
muscles are sore or I have a cramp in my muscle. I have a family history of nut allergies. I have  
08:11
a family history of... This is a common phrase  you might use at the doctor when the doctor wants  
08:17
to know what your parents or your brothers and  sisters or your grandparents had problems with.  
08:24
They need to know that to better assess you so you  might use this phrase. I have a family history of  
08:30
diabetes. I have a family history of something.  Another way to phrase this is diabetes  
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runs in my family. We're not talking about  running. We're just talking about something  
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that's gone from generation to generation and a  lot of people in your family have this problem.  
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We might say allergies run in my  family. Diabetes runs in my family. 
08:54
Next, let's talk about some common vocabulary  for things that might happen to you or someone  
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you know. I jammed my finger playing basketball or  I sprained my wrist playing volleyball. I twisted  
09:09
my ankle and now it's swollen. I broke my arm  when I fell out of the tree. I tweaked my back  
09:19
trying to pick up that heavy box. I cut my finger  by accident with a sharp knife in the kitchen.  
09:28
My son tripped and skinned his knee. This  means it's not so serious, it's not a deep  
09:34
cut. It just means that a layer of skin has  come off. This happens often to children,  
09:39
especially on their knees or the bottoms,  the palms of their hands. You might skin  
09:45
your knees or skin the palms of your hands. Oh, I pulled a muscle trying to pick up that heavy  
09:53
box. Now I need to sit down and put some ice on  it. I pulled a muscle. If you are a parent, this  
10:01
probably happens to you a lot. I always stub my  toe on my kids' toys. Maybe that means we need to  
10:08
clean them up more often. If you have ever stubbed  your toe, you know it doesn't feel any good. 
10:15
When you have any of these problems, you might  go to the doctor and the doctor might tell you  
10:20
to do something. The doctor might tell you to take  some medicine. I have a headache and now I'm going  
10:27
to take some medicine. We often sometimes say,  take my medicine so you can either say, I need to  
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take my medicine, it's three o'clock or you might  take some medicine if you want to be more general. 
10:39
I need to take a Tylenol. I need to take an  ibuprofen. These are the kinds of medicines  
10:46
that you might take if you have a headache, if  you have some pain in a specific place and it's  
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not a major injury, you might take an  ibuprofen or you might take a Tylenol. 
10:58
I feel hot. I think I need to take my temperature.  I need to take my temperature. The doctor said,  
11:04
I need to take it easy for a couple days. This  means rest and relax. We also use this phrase  
11:11
for someone when they're not sick, just to say  goodbye. You might say, bye, see you later,  
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take it easy. This doesn't mean that they  should lay on the couch because they're sick.  
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It just means have a good time, have a relaxing  weekend. Take it easy, a very common phrase to say  
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goodbye and we can also use this when someone's  sick. Hey, you should really take it easy and  
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don't do too much work this weekend. Just stay  on the couch and try to recover. Take it easy. 
11:40
When I had the flu, the doctor told me I need to  get a lot of fluids so that I would feel better.  
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This could be water, it might be soup, it might be  tea. Some kind of fluids or liquid in our bodies. 
11:54
The doctor told me I need to get a box of  Kleenex so that I don't sneeze everywhere  
12:00
and get other people sick. In the US, we often use  the brand name Kleenex instead of saying tissue,  
12:09
but it's the same thing. You can also say,  can you me a tissue? I need to blow my nose.  
12:15
A lot of people say, can you get me  a Kleenex? I need to blow my nose. 
12:19
Ah, I cut my finger. I need to get a Band-Aid.  A Band-Aid, this is another brand name that we  
12:26
use for a generic item so you could say a bandage,  but in the US a bandage feels very serious. You  
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have a big cut, only really a doctor would give  you a bandage. If you have just a small cut,  
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you can use a Band-Aid. If you have children,  sometimes a Band-Aid solves many problems. If  
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there's just a little cut, but they feel like  it's so serious, a Band-Aid can always help. 
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If you have a bigger cut, you might need  to get stitches. Ugh, I really hope I don't  
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need to get stitches on my finger, I hate  needles. Have you ever had to get stitches? 
13:03
When I was in high school, I broke my wrist  and I needed to get a cast. A cast is very hard  
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and it helps your broken bone. For me, it was my  wrist, to feel better within a couple weeks and to  
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be able to heal. You might need to get a cast. When you're simply not feeling well,  
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you need to make an appointment or make a doctor's  appointment and the doctor can give you a more  
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professional assessment better than your  friends and family and doctor Google.  
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It's a good idea to make an appointment. Another way to say this is I'm feeling  
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a bit under the weather, I think I need to see  the doctor. I think I need to go to the doctor.  
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These are all ways to say, I need  to get a professional's opinion. 
13:49
How are you feeling? We just covered a lot of  questions in vocabulary that I hope you can  
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use in your day daily life. Now it's time  to see a sample conversation. My husband,  
13:59
Dan and I are talking about some time that I  did not feel well and he's trying to help me.  
14:05
Listen for all of the key phrases that you  just learned because after this conversation,  
14:10
it's going to be your turn to speak with  me and use those phrases too. All right,  
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let's watch. Vanessa: 
14:16
Morning. Dan: 
14:18
Morning. Are you feeling okay? Vanessa: 
14:21
I don't feel so hot. I woke up this morning  feeling woozy and now I feel achy and lethargic. 
14:27
Dan: Oh no. Do you want to lie down?  
14:30
Have you taken anything for it? Vanessa: 
14:33
No, I haven't, not yet, but I think  I'm going to call the doctor today.  
14:37
Do I feel hot? Dan: 
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Yeah, you do. Why don't you lie down on the  couch and relax. Can I bring you anything? 
14:46
Vanessa: I need to get some more fluids so  
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some hot tea would be great. Dan: 
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Well, you took care of me when I  cut my hand and needed stitches.  
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Now it's my turn to take care of you. Take  it easy and I'll make an appointment for you. 
14:59
Vanessa: Thanks hun. 
15:01
Okay, are you ready? I'm going to be asking  you a question and pausing and I want you  
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to use what you've learned today and respond to  me. Pretend like we're having a conversation. If  
15:13
you need to pause this video so that you can think  about it or answer for longer, great. You can do  
15:19
that. That's the benefit of a video and you can  always go back and review this section again and  
15:24
again. Are you ready? Let's do it. It's your turn. Hey, you don't look so well. Are you feeling okay?  
15:39
Have you taken anything for it?  
15:48
Well, you should take it easy and get  some rest. Can I get you anything?  
15:59
All right, I hope this helps. Get well soon. 
16:02
Well, how did you do? How are you feeling? I hope  that that sample conversation was a good way to  
16:09
test your skills and also to do better and  better each time that you do it. Please go back  
16:15
and review this section again and again. Now  I have a question for you. Let me know in the  
16:20
comments, when was the last time that you were  sick and how were you feeling? Can you describe  
16:27
some of your symptoms? Maybe you felt woozy or  clammy or you had a fever. Let me know in the  
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comments and don't forget to download the free PDF  worksheet. This is a big one with all of today's  
16:39
questions and vocabulary. All of these great  phrases that you can use to describe when  
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you don't feel well and also you can use them to  help other people when they don't feel well. Make  
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sure you download the free PDF worksheet. There  is a link in the description so that you can never  
16:55
forget these phrases and you can answer Vanessa's  challenge question at the bottom of the worksheet. 
17:00
Well, thank you so much for learning English with  me and I'll see you again next Friday for a new  
17:05
lesson here on my YouTube channel. Bye. The next step is to download the free  
17:11
PDF worksheet for this lesson. With this  free PDF, you will master today's lesson  
17:17
and never forget what you have learned.  You can be a confident English speaker.  
17:23
Don't forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel  for a free English lesson every Friday. Bye.
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