Speak ADVANCED English in 30 minutes: American English Lesson

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2022-06-03・ 10035

Speak English With Vanessa channel


Is it possible to speak ADVANCED English in 30 minutes? Let's try! Download the free PDF worksheet for this lesson here: http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com/free Download my free e-book: "5 Steps To Becoming A Confident English Speaker" http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com/free-ebook --------------------------------------------------------------------- English book recommendations: https://www.amazon.com/shop/speakenglishwithvanessa Subscribe and follow on social media! I'd love to meet you! YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=theteachervanessa Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/englishwithvanessa/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/speakenglishwithvanessa Send us a postcard from your country: Speak English With Vanessa 825 C Merrimon Ave PMB # 278 Asheville, NC 28804 USA --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speak English With Vanessa helps English learners to speak American English fluently, naturally, and confidently. To become a fluent English speaker and have English conversations with a native English speaker, go to http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com

Instruction

Double-click on the English captions to play the video from there.

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Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.  
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Can you speak advanced  English? Let's talk about it. 
00:13
Let's imagine this scene; you are visiting the  US and you're about to go eat sushi for dinner.  
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You're walking along and you turn the corner,  and you see me walking on the sidewalk. You shout  
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for joy and say, "Hey, Vanessa! Do you want  to join me for dinner? We're eating sushi." 
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I walk over. I'm excited to meet you.  And then your face goes like this,  
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"I think I saw in one of your videos that  you don't like sushi." And I say, "Oh,  
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I do like sushi. In fact, I can eat quite a  few sushi rolls." You probably understand the  
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general idea of what I'm trying to say,  but this sentence is advanced English. 
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I said, "I do like sushi." Well, generally, in  English, we don't put "do" before "like." So why  
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did I say this? Is this a grammatical mistake?  And what about this expression, "Quite a few  
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sushi rolls?" Usually, few means a little. But why  did I say, "Quite a few?" Oh, this is an advanced  
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English phrase I would love for you to learn. If you would like to speak advanced English  
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like this and impress me when you meet me on the  sidewalk, well, never fear. Today, you are going  
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to learn to speak advanced American English. And  like always, to help you never forget what you  
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learn in today's lesson, I have created a free PDF  worksheet with all of today's advanced phrases,  
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advanced verbs, advanced sentence structures,  to help you be able to speak advanced English.  
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You can click on the link in the description  to download this free PDF worksheet today. 
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In this lesson, you will see two of my most  popular advanced English lessons. So are  
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you ready to level up your English? Let's go. It's a fact that the more vocabulary you know,  
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the more you can understand natural, fast English  conversations and the more that you can express  
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yourself. So today I'd like to help you learn  10 essential advanced English expressions.  
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These aren't specifically for business  situations, but you could use them then.  
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These aren't really just slang expressions, but  you could use them in casual situations too. 
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These are phrases for daily life. They're  phrases that I use all the time. And I have  
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a feeling that you're going to hear  them all the time. And hopefully,  
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now you're going to be able to use them yourself. During today's lesson, try to say the sample  
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sentences out loud with me. This is a great  chance to practice your pronunciation muscles,  
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listen to your own voice speaking and using great  English grammar and vocabulary. And it's a good  
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way to help you remember what you're learning. All right, let's start with the first expression.  
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To take something seriously. Usually,  we use the word "take," this verb,  
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when we're grabbing something or when  we're getting something. But instead,  
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this expression uses "take" in a figurative sense.  This means you're accepting something sincerely. 
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We often use this in a negative sense.  For example, let's look at this sentence,  
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"When the teenager told her mom, 'I hate  you,' her mom didn't take it seriously."  
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This is a negative situation, "Didn't  take it seriously." What is "it?"  
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Are we using "it" to talk about her daughter?  No, we're talking about her daughter's words. 
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So the mom is not feeling like this is a sincere  statement from her daughter. Because her daughter  
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is a teenager, maybe she's going through some  hard times. So the mom is not going to get upset  
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when her daughter says, "I hate you." She's  not going to take those words seriously. 
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Or you might say, "I wish I had taken school  seriously." "Take school seriously" means to  
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study hard, to be sincere in your efforts. I  wish I had taken school seriously, but I still  
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graduated even though I didn't learn as much as I  could have. I wish I had taken school seriously. 
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Let's go to the next expression; on top of. Are  we talking about physical placement here? No.  
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Instead, take a look at this sentence  and try to guess what you think it means.  
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"My dog ripped my school books, and  on top of that, he ate my homework." 
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So we have a bad situation that has become  worse. So my dog ripped my school books,  
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this is already a bad situation, but then  on top of that, he ate my homework. So we  
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can use this wonderful expression "on top  of" just like we would "in addition to." 
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Usually, it shows some kind of surprise. On top  of that, he ate my homework. I can't believe it.  
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I'm surprised. In addition to what he already  did, he ate my homework. Or you might say,  
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"This vocabulary lesson is great,  on top of that, it's free." 
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So you could say, "In addition to that,  it's free." That's fine. But when you say,  
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"On top of that," you're implying that you're  kind of surprised. I can't believe that  
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Vanessa is giving us this lesson for free.  On top of that, it's free. Wonderful. 
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Quite a few. If I said I ate quite a few cookies,  do you think this means a few, a little, or a lot?  
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This expression can be a little bit tricky because  even though it uses a few, which usually means a  
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small amount, this expression really means a lot. The word "a few" means a little, but when we add  
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"quite," we're making this an indirect way  to say a lot. Quite a few cookies, maybe  
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20 cookies. This is a lot of cookies for one  person to eat, so you might say, "I ate quite  
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a few cookies." You're being indirect about how  many cookies you ate, but we know it was a lot. 
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Or you could say, "Quite a few students  participated in the 30-day listening challenge."  
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This means a lot of students participated  in the 30-day listening challenge. 
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If I want to be a little more indirect,  then this is a great statement. I could say,  
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"A lot of students participated." But  to be a little indirect, we could say,  
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"Quite a few students participated in  the course, and I hope you can too." 
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Little to no. What is happening here? Little  to no. "I invited 20 people to my party, but  
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little to no people responded." Let's think about  this phrase as a scale. Little is on one side,  
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so a few people, a couple of people, and  then no people are on the other side.  
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So little to no. "A lot of people"  is not even on the scale. So we have  
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a little to no. Little to no people responded. You can also think about this like one  
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to 10. If we use this same idea with the  word "to," we're talking about a scale.  
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One to 10 people responded. Okay, this is the  same idea. It's a scale. But you will also hear  
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little to no people responded. What about this sentence?  
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"Last week, he had little to no time to cook.  He was so busy." So here we're talking about  
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little time, maybe 20 minutes, to no time to cook.  He was so busy. He had little to no time to cook. 
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To be a roller coaster. This is a figurative  expression. We're not talking about actually  
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sitting on a rollercoaster, which is the ride at  an amusement park. Instead, we're going to use  
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this figuratively. And you could say, "Last year  was such a rollercoaster. I got married, and then  
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I got fired from my job, and then I moved to New  York." So there's a lot of positive and negative  
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things that are happening. It's a rollercoaster. I got married, and then I got fired, and then I  
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moved to New York. So we're talking about the  ups and downs of life. It's a rollercoaster.  
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We often use this word with "emotional." It's an  emotional rollercoaster. The relationship was an  
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emotional rollercoaster for six months. If one of your friends is dating someone  
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and the relationship just isn't very  smooth, they don't get along too well,  
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they don't really communicate that well, you might  say, "Yeah, that relationship was an emotional  
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rollercoaster." Sometimes they loved each other,  sometimes they were so angry, then they loved  
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each other. Not a very healthy relationship. It  was an emotional rollercoaster for six months. 
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What about this expression? "I'm talking." Does  it mean I'm speaking out loud? No. Instead, this  
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is often used to give more information about a  specific point. It's kind of a casual expression.  
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So let's imagine the situation, you're  sitting in a classroom and the teacher says,  
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"This semester, we will be studying historical  figures. I'm talking, Winston Churchill,  
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Genghis Khan, Aristotle." She's giving more information about  
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who are historical figures. So she could have just  said, "We will be studying historical figures."  
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Okay. But she wanted to give more clarification  about this point, historical figures. So she said,  
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"I'm talking Genghis Khan, Winston Churchill,  Aristotle." This is a wide spectrum of people,  
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so that's why she used this  expression, "I'm talking." 
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Let's look at another example. "The restaurant  was so fancy. I'm talking, suit and tie,  
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a local weekly menu, a live cello player." Oh,  you're giving more clarification about fancy. What  
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does fancy mean? What is a fancy restaurant? Oh,  well, you're going to give us some more details  
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about this point. You're going to talk about a  suit and tie. Maybe you had to wear a suit and  
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tie. Maybe the servers wore a suit and ties. There's a local weekly menu that changes every  
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week, and there was a live cello player. That's  pretty fancy if you ask me. So you're clarifying.  
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I'm talking, this, this, and this. Great. The next expression is "at all." At all.  
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This means completely. And it is only used  in negative situations. "I haven't studied  
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for my test at all." "I haven't," that's our  negative part. "I haven't studied at all." 
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Or you could say, "I haven't studied completely,"  but "at all" is much more natural. So we can add  
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this always to the end of the sentence. "I  haven't studied at all." Or you could say,  
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"I thought my cats would be annoyed about having  a new baby at home, but they don't care at all."  
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"They don't," so we're using that negative  word. "They don't care at all." Do they have  
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any care about the new baby? No.  None at all. Notice how this is  
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always used at the end of the sentence. Six figures. Are we talking about six people?  
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No. What if I said this sentence? "He wants to be  a doctor because he wants a six-figure salary."  
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What can you guess? What do you think that  this expression means: six-figure salary? 
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Well, we're talking about numbers that have  six figures, so this means $100,000 and up.  
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100,000, 200,000, 300,000. When you're a doctor,  at least in the US, usually, you make a lot of  
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money, so you have a six-figure salary. The term  six-figure just denotes money above 100,000.  
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Or you could say, "They earned six figures last  year." That talks about how much money they made. 
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I had a student in the 30-day listening  challenge ask, "Can you say five figures?"  
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For example, "I have a five-figure salary.  He makes five figures." Not really.  
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We really only use this with six figures. And I think it's just because five figures  
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could be $10,000, which, in the US, is not  a high salary, or it could be $90,000, which  
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is a lot of money. So it doesn't  really have the same implication. 
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But when you say six figures, this is always  a lot of money. So even if you make 100,000  
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compared to 900,000, it's still a lot of money.  So we only use this when we're talking about six  
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figures in a salary. To go through something. We're not  
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talking about going through a tunnel. Instead,  this is a figurative phrasal verb expression.  
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And it's talking about experiencing a lot of  negative things, a lot of negative experiences. 
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You might say, "Last month I went through  a lot. My grandmother was in the hospital,  
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my car broke down, and I had a terrible cold."  So you experienced a lot of negative things. I  
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went through a lot. You can use this in a  more vague situation. You could just say,  
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"You're going through a lot right now. Please take  care of yourself." You're going through a lot. 
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You can use it to talk about your friend.  Let's say that you're having a dinner  
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party and your friend doesn't come and someone  says, "Hey, why didn't he come?" You might say,  
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"He's going through a lot right now. He needs some  quiet time by himself." He's going through a lot.  
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And this implies he's having a lot of difficult  experiences right now, so let's take it easy. 
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Our final expression is to make it. Does this  mean create something, to make something? Nope.  
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Instead, to make it means to be successful. You  might say, "He's moving to LA to become a movie  
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star. I hope he makes it." You can substitute in  this sentence and say, "I hope he's successful."  
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I hope he makes it. And "it" here is just  his goal. I hope he makes it. But we always  
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keep this expression together, "Makes it." Or we could talk about being successful in a  
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more vague way. You might say, "He  drove to the concert through the rain,  
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the snow, the hail; and finally, he made it."  He was successfully at his destination. He  
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successfully arrived at his destination; the  concert. He made it. So it implies struggle,  
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but he was successful in the end. This isn't talking about his career,  
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like going to LA, becoming a movie star. You  made it. No. Instead, he just successfully  
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arrived at his destination. "Whew. After all  of that rain, snow, hail, I made it, great." 
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Excellent work with these 10 new phrases.  You opened your mind to these new phrases,  
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so I hope that you'll be able  to hear them all around you now. 
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Today, your mind is about to expand, maybe even  explode. You might think that you know how to use  
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these three simple verbs, but do you really know  how to use them? Sometimes English learners think  
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that to speak advanced English, you need to use  advanced verbs, but that's not always the case.  
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Sometimes you need to use simple verbs in  an advanced way. Are you curious? Good. 
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Today, I'm going to help you use "tell," "do,"  and "bet" in a more advanced, natural way. Are  
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you ready to get started with the first one? Let's  start with the verb "tell." The first meaning of  
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the word "tell" you probably know. "I'm going to  tell you a secret." "Do you know what she told  
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me yesterday?" This just means simply to talk. But this is the simple way to use "tell." Let's  
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take it to the next level. Let's take a look at  this sentence. "I couldn't tell if he was a boy  
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or a girl." Does this mean I couldn't talk about  if he was a boy or a girl? No. We're using "tell"  
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in an advanced way here. This means I didn't  know if he was a boy or a girl. I couldn't tell. 
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Let's look at a few other sentences that use  "tell" in an advanced way that means to understand  
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or to know something. "It was hard to tell."  This means it was hard to know. "I couldn't tell  
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by looking at his face." I couldn't know if  he was a boy or a girl by looking at his face. 
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You might notice that we often use the word "tell"  in this advanced way with the verb "can." Let's  
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take a look at another scenario. "Can you  usually tell when someone's lying to you?"  
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This means do you easily know when someone's lying  to you? Can you easily understand when someone's  
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lying compared to telling the truth? You might also say, "I couldn't tell  
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that he was lying." This doesn't mean I  couldn't talk about the fact that he was lying.  
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It means I just didn't know that he was  lying. I couldn't tell that he was lying. 
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Let's go to the second simple verb  that we can make more advanced.  
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What do you think about this sentence? "I do like  seafood." Listen to which word is emphasized here.  
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I do like seafood. I do like seafood. There are  two verbs, "do" and "like," but one of them is  
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emphasized. I do like seafood. It's the verb "do." Native speakers often use the verb "do"  
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to show emphasis, especially to emphasize the  truth. Let's take a look at some examples. If  
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you say to me, "Vanessa, do you want to go  to an all-you-can-eat seafood buffet for my  
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birthday?" And then you hesitate and say, "Oh, I  forgot that you don't like seafood. I'm sorry." 
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But really, I love seafood. So I want to politely  tell you, you're wrong, I like seafood. How can I  
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say that in a polite way? Well, I can simply say,  "I do like seafood." So I'm emphasizing that I  
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like it, but I'm also emphasizing that this is the  truth. You had an opinion that wasn't the truth,  
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and now I'm sharing the truth with you. Oh, that's  not true. I do like seafood. I want to come. I  
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want to go to the all-you-can-eat seafood buffet. Let's look at another example. A couple of weeks  
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ago, my husband Dan and I met some new  friends and they invited us over to their  
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house to have dinner. It was really nice of  them. But on the morning of that dinner, Dan  
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woke up really sick. Dan is my husband. He only  gets sick maybe once a year, but that was the day.  
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It was not a good day for him. He was on the  couch all day. It happens to all of us, right? 
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Well, so I needed to call our new friends and  say, "Dan really does want to come to dinner,  
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but he's too sick." I wanted to emphasize that he  does want to come. He wants to come to your house,  
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but he's too sick. I ended up going to the dinner by myself  
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and it was a lovely time, but it was a sad time  for Dan because he was just at home, on the couch.  
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Why did I choose to add "do" to this sentence?  What kind of truth am I trying to reveal to them? 
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Well, I was a little bit worried that, because we  didn't know them, we didn't know them very well at  
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least, I was worried that they would think Dan was  just making an excuse, that he didn't want to go,  
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and I was calling to make an excuse  for him. But that wasn't the truth.  
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He was actually really sick. And it was a  good idea that he didn't go to the dinner. 
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So I wanted to let them know, this is his true  feelings. He really does want to go to your house,  
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but he's too sick. We often use this advanced form of  
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"do" with the word "but," because we're telling  the truth, and then we're showing an excuse.  
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Let's take a look at a couple of sentences.  "I really do want to study English every day,  
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but I usually forget." So you're  showing your true feelings, "I really  
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do want to study English." And then you have  the excuse, "But I usually forget." Oh no. 
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"My manager does want to speak with you, but she's  busy right now." If you get a call from someone  
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from another branch and you're trying to let them  know your manager is busy; it's not an excuse,  
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it's true that your manager is busy; you could  use this verb to let them know this is the truth. 
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"My manager does want to speak with you, but she's  too busy right now." You're letting that person  
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know on the phone, maybe some representative  from another branch, you're letting them know,  
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this isn't just an excuse. "It's true,  my manager does want to speak with you."  
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And then you have an excuse, "But she's just  busy right now. She'll call you back later."  
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My manager does want to speak with you. Or you could say, "She does have a car,  
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but she just rides her bike everywhere instead."  If you always see your friend riding her bike,  
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you might wonder, does she not have a car?  Why is she always riding her bike? And then  
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you could say, "She does have a car." You're  emphasizing this truth. "She does have a car,  
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but she just chooses to ride her bike instead." Let's go to the third verb that we can make more  
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advanced. I use this one all the time. So I'm  so glad to share it with you because you'll  
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be able to understand it when I use it and when  other people use it. It's the word "bet." "Have  
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you ever bet some money that your team would  win?" This is the simple way to use "bet." 
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It means you think your team will win, so you put  some money on the table. If your team wins, you  
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get more money. If your team loses, you lose all  your money. This is the simple way to use "bet." 
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Let's make it more advanced though. "I bet that  you want to be a fluent English speaker." I don't  
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know this 100%, but I'm 99% certain that you want  to be a fluent English speaker. So I can say, "I  
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bet that you want to be a fluent English speaker."  I'm just guessing your opinion. This more advanced  
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way to use "bet" means I'm almost certain.  I'm not 100% certain, but I'm almost certain. 
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Let's look at some ways that you can use  this naturally. The phrase "I bet" is often  
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used to show empathy or caring when someone's  going through a situation. So you might say,  
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"I bet that you were sad when your dog died." This  means I'm not 100% certain, but I'm letting you  
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know that I can imagine your feelings. I'm almost  certain that you were sad when your dog died,  
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and I want you to know that I understand you were  sad. I bet you were really sad when your dog died. 
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Do you see the tone of my voice and  the look on my face? It shows caring  
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and empathy. "I bet you were really sad." Let's look at another example. "I bet that  
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you were annoyed when your boss didn't give  you a raise." I'm not 100% certain, but I'm  
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mostly certain that you were annoyed when your  boss didn't give you a raise. This is a really  
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kind and thoughtful and polite  expression to use when someone you  
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know is having a difficult time in their life. If your friend was expecting a raise and then  
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you see them and they look pretty sad and  they tell you, "I didn't get the raise,"  
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you could use this expression. "I bet you  were annoyed when your boss didn't give you  
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that raise." "I bet you were really disappointed  when your boss didn't give you that raise." You're  
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sharing feelings with them. You're empathizing. You can use "I bet" for those negative situations  
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like, "I bet that was really hard." "I bet that  situation was really hard for you." But you can  
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also use it in positive situations. "I bet you're  glad that your exams are over." The word "glad"  
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is not a negative thing, it's a positive  thing. But you're letting them know,  
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I understand your feelings. "I bet you're glad  the exams are over. Now you can finally relax." 
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We just talked about how you can  use "I bet" to show someone that  
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you are understanding and caring about their  feelings. This is kind of a deep friendship  
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type of expression. But there's a lighter way  that we can use it as well; it's simply when  
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you're predicting what might happen in the future. You could simply say, "I bet that it will rain  
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today." "I bet that it's going to rain." "There's  dark clouds. The air is a little bit moist. I bet  
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it's going to rain." You're just predicting.  You're almost certain. You're not 100% certain,  
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but you're almost certain that it's going to rain. Or if you've never been skiing, like me,  
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you might say, "I bet that I'm going to break my  leg when I go skiing." This is a prediction for  
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the future. I hope whenever I go skiing for the  first time, this doesn't happen. But you can use  
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this expression to say, this is my prediction.  It will probably happen, not 100%, but there  
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is a high possibility that it might happen. I bet  I'll break my leg or I bet that I'll break my leg. 
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Notice that in all of these sentences, we  use the pronoun "I." I bet. This is because  
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I'm certain. I don't know your certainty, but  I know my certainty. I bet it's going to rain.  
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I bet you were sad. I bet that was a hard  time. I'm talking about my own certainty. 
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It's not so common to hear this with other  pronouns. You bet that this will happen. He  
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bets that this will happen. It's most likely  that you're going to hear this with "I bet."  
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So I want you to be able to use that too. Before we go, let's do a little review. I  
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want you to say these sentences out loud, exercise  your pronunciation muscles, and speak. It's going  
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to help you to remember these three simple verbs  used in an advanced way. Are you ready? Let's go. 
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"I couldn't tell if he was a boy or a girl." "It  was hard to tell." "Can you usually tell when  
27:22
someone is lying to you?" "I can't tell."  "I forgot that you don't like seafood."  
27:30
"No, I do like seafood." "I really do want to  study English every day, but I always forget." 
27:39
"She does have a car, but she  always rides her bike instead."  
27:44
"I bet that you want to be a fluent English  speaker." "I bet that you were annoyed when  
27:50
your boss didn't give you a raise." "I  bet you're glad that the exams are over."  
27:57
"I bet that it's going to rain today." How did you do? Did you get some pronunciation  
28:02
practice? I hope so. Now I have a question  for you. In the comments, I want to know what  
28:08
is something that you really do want to do but  you just don't do. For example, you might say,  
28:15
"I really do want to go to bed earlier, but the  night just passes so quickly. And before I know  
28:22
it, it's 2:00 AM." Or, "I really do want to see  my parents more, but I'm just too busy." Let  
28:29
me know in the comments. What is something that  you really do want to do, but you just don't do? 
28:36
Congratulations on leveling up your English  skills. Don't forget to download the free PDF  
28:42
worksheet for today's lesson with all of these  expressions, verbs, sample sentences, grammatical  
28:49
structures, all of the ideas from this lesson  so that you can speak advanced American English. 
28:54
You can click on the link, download the  PDF, print it out if you would like,  
28:59
put it under your pillow as you sleep, and  dream about speaking advanced American English.  
29:04
You can do it. Click on the link in the  description to download the PDF worksheet today. 
29:09
Well, thank you so much for learning English with  me. I will see you again next Friday for a new  
29:15
lesson here on my YouTube channel. Bye. The next step is to download the free  
29:21
PDF worksheet for this lesson. With this  free PDF, you will master today's lesson  
29:28
and never forget what you have learned. You  can be a confident English speaker. Don't  
29:34
forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel  for a free English lesson every Friday. Bye.
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