British vs. New Zealand vs. Australian English Accents (+ Free PDF & Quiz)

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2021-06-23・ 24801

English with Lucy channel


Loo, lav or dunny? No worries or no wuckas? We speak the same English language in 3 very different ways - UK vs NZ vs AUS English slang and vocabulary! Download the free PDF here: https://bit.ly/AusNzUkVocabPDF A HUGE thank you to my amazing guests on today's episode: Rosie's Channel: https://bit.ly/NotEvenFrench Rosie runs an awesome NZ and French language and culture channel. She also has a career coaching channel: https://bit.ly/BadassCareers - amazing as I know many of your are looking to write a CV, cover letter, or take an interview. Pete's Channel: https://bit.ly/AussieEnglish Pete runs an incredible Australian English language channel as well as the Aussie English podcast, which you can listen to here: https://bit.ly/AussieEnglishPod This is a look at 3 of the MANY English accents! I would love to extend this series - please let me know which accents you’d like me to look at next time! DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE EMAILS FROM LUCY? Sign up here: https://bit.ly/EmailsFromLucy Don't forget to turn on subtitles if you need them! This is how I generate my subtitles (you can get a $10 subtitle coupon too): https://www.rev.com/blog/coupon/?ref=lucy (affiliate) Visit my website for free PDFs and an interactive pronunciation tool! https://englishwithlucy.co.uk​ MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Personal Channel: http://bit.ly/LucyBella​​​ (I post subtitled vlogs of my life in the English countryside! Perfect for listening practice!) Instagram: @Lucy http://bit.ly/lucyinsta​​​​​​​​​​ My British English Pronunciation Course is now LIVE: https://englishwithlucy.co.uk/pronunciationcourse (use code YOUTUBE10 for a 10% discount!) Do you want to improve your pronunciation? I have launched my British English (Modern RP) pronunciation course! I’ll train you to read phonetic transcriptions, and produce each sound that comprises modern received pronunciation. I’ll also teach you how to implement the correct use of intonation, stress, rhythm, connected speech, and much more. We’ll compare similar sounds, and look at tricky topics like the glottal stop and the dark L. Technically, I need to mark this as an AD even though it is my own company so - AD :) Want to get a copy of my English Vocabulary Planners? Click here: https://shop.englishwithlucy.co.uk - The best offer is the 4-book bundle where you get 4 planners for the price of 3. This product is very limited - don't miss out. The English Plan will be shipped from early August, from me here in England to you across the world! We ship internationally! Watch my explainer video here: https://bit.ly/TheEnglishPlanVideo Practice speaking: Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy... (ad affiliate) Improve listening! Free Audible audiobook: https://goo.gl/LshaPp If you like my lessons, and would like to support me, you can buy me a coffee here: https://ko-fi.com/englishwithlucy FREE £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa (ad - affiliate) Email for business enquiries ONLY: [email protected] Edited by La Ferpection: https://www.laferpection.com/​​

Instruction

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00:02
(soft music)
00:10
- Hello everyone and welcome back to "English With Lucy".
00:12
I have got to such an exciting video for you today.
00:16
We are going to be comparing New Zealand,
00:18
Australian and British English slang.
00:22
And I've got two fantastic collaborators
00:25
on board with me today, representing Australian English
00:29
we have got Pete
00:31
- Get a you mob I'm Pete,
00:32
the host of "Aussie English", a YouTube channel
00:34
and podcast aimed at teaching people Australian English,
00:38
culture and history.
00:40
I am from the Southeast of Australia
00:43
- And we also have it Rosie from "Not Even French".
00:46
- (speaks in foreign language) English with Lucy fans.
00:48
My name is Rosie from the YouTube channel, "Not Even French"
00:51
where we jam on all things
00:53
French culture and language and Kiwi culture or New Zealand
00:57
culture and language as well.
00:59
- It's such a pleasure to have them both on the channel.
01:01
I have left all of their details
01:04
in the description box down below.
01:06
This is a two-part video
01:07
this week we'll be looking at the slang, the vocabulary
01:11
and in the next video, we'll be comparing pronunciation.
01:14
I know for a lot of you,
01:16
New Zealand English and Australian English
01:19
sounds extremely similar but there are some differences
01:22
so we'll be listening out for that.
01:24
Something else quite interesting that I have left
01:27
in the description box down below is a link
01:30
which leads to a free PDF that I have created
01:33
that goes with this lesson.
01:34
If you would like to download that free PDF
01:37
all you've got to do is click on that link
01:39
and then you sign up to my mailing list
01:41
and I will then send the PDF directly to your inbox.
01:45
You will then get all future PDFs for free each week
01:49
plus all of my news, offers and course information.
01:53
Okay, let's begin with the comparison.
01:55
I am going to show some images
01:57
to Pete and Rosie and they are going to tell us
02:00
what they would call the images in their own dialect.
02:03
Please let me know in the comments section
02:05
if you say something completely different
02:08
let me know where you're from as well
02:09
it'd be really nice to share vocabulary.
02:12
Let's get started with number one.
02:14
I forgot to tell you where I'm from
02:17
I I'm Lucy I'm from the UK specifically Cambridge Share.
02:23
- All right, so the first image here is clearly an esky.
02:28
This is something in Australia
02:29
that I think we call it an esky from the word Eskimo.
02:33
- Okay, so this item for me is a chilli bin.
02:39
- Okay, this for me is a cool box
02:42
but I much prefer their words.
02:44
It's amazing how these countries can be
02:46
so close together relatively.
02:48
They also sound to somebody who isn't
02:51
from that part of the world, quite similar to one another.
02:53
So it's really cool to see that they have such different
02:56
slang words for things.
02:58
Okay, number two, what would you call this?
03:01
- All right so this is clearly chewing gum
03:04
but the Australian slang term for chewing gum
03:06
would be chewy.
03:09
And I know you guys are gonna think about
03:10
the character from "Star Wars".
03:12
Yes that joke gets made a little bit
03:14
but we also use the slang term chewy
03:17
for chewing gum, chewy.
03:20
- So this is of course chewing gum,
03:22
but in New Zealand slang we would say chuddy,
03:25
hey can I have a piece of your chuddy?
03:28
- Interesting this for us is just gum.
03:32
Kinda have some gum, I like chuddy though.
03:35
All right number three.
03:37
- This is a milk bar, a milk bar.
03:40
I guess you could probably say corner shop
03:42
if it were on a corner.
03:43
- In New Zealand English, this is a dairy, a dairy.
03:48
- It's so interesting that both
03:50
of them are related to dairy product.
03:52
A milk bar to me sounds very similar to a milky bar
03:56
which is a brand of white chocolate.
03:57
This for us is a corner shop, a corner shop.
04:01
They're not always on a corner only sometimes.
04:04
Onto number four.
04:05
- All right so what do you call someone who is stupid
04:09
in Australian English we use all the standard ones
04:12
but we would call someone a drongo.
04:14
A drongo and another good one is an ningbat, an ningbat.
04:19
But yeah, drongo is a ripper I use that one drongo.
04:23
- We would call someone like this an egg.
04:25
Oh my gosh, what an egg.
04:28
- I love it.
04:29
And I love the pronunciation of which I would say egg, egg.
04:35
We'll talk about that in the next video.
04:37
So much to take in here, ningbat what a word,
04:41
drongo I love that sound 'ng sound in both of these.
04:46
Yeah if someone called me an egg,
04:48
I would be pretty sure it wasn't a compliment.
04:50
In British English there's one word that we love to use,
04:53
and that is twit.
04:56
So many people are going to be watching this and thinking
04:58
no we don't say that it's quite an old fashioned word, twit.
05:04
It's also similar to a swear word.
05:07
So it's quite a nice way to catch someone off guard.
05:10
I also really like thicko.
05:13
If someone's thick, it means they're stupid.
05:15
So if you say,
05:16
oh he's such a thicko that that's quite good.
05:18
In British English we like to use idioms
05:20
to describe stupid people.
05:22
Like he's one sandwich short of a picnic
05:24
or he's not the sharpest tool in the shed, for example,
05:27
I in fact have a whole video on British polite
05:32
really ways to call somebody a total idiot
05:35
I will link that down below as well.
05:37
Okay onto the next.
05:39
- When you really agree with someone, you say bloody oath
05:44
bloody oath, that's a great Australian slang term
05:47
that you can use for agreeing with someone, bloody oath.
05:50
- In New Zealand we would say hard out.
05:52
Yes, hard out that's so true.
05:55
- Okay, for me it would absolutely, absolutely,
06:01
absolutely bloody exactly.
06:05
I just can't even fathom how ridiculous I would sound
06:07
saying hard out, bloody oath
06:11
actually that sounds quite good
06:12
but hard out, just doesn't work with my accent, does it?
06:17
Onto the next before I embarrass myself even more.
06:21
- All right, I'm sick of always doing this one.
06:23
These are thongs, we call them thongs.
06:26
I don't why call we them thongs but these are thongs.
06:28
- These are so obviously jandals, Japanese sandals, jandals.
06:36
- Okay I put this one on purpose because I know
06:40
that in Australia they call flip-flops for me thongs
06:46
and in the UK, a thong refers to a very minimal item
06:50
of underwear for women, knickers with just a bit of string
06:53
at the back at g-string, for example.
06:56
So I always find it so hilarious to hear
06:59
people talking about their thongs so openly.
07:02
Jandals I haven't heard that before
07:04
quite clever, actually jandals Japanese sandals.
07:08
It makes sense for us flip flops onto the next.
07:12
- There's about five different ways of saying this
07:14
in Australian English slang.
07:16
Okay, so I would say bathers from the South East
07:19
of Australia, you could also say cozzies, togs swimmers.
07:24
I'm probably missing some more.
07:26
- Togs, you got to get your togs out for summer.
07:30
- Interesting that they both say togs.
07:33
We also use cozzie in the UK short for swimming costume.
07:37
I think togs might've come from a brand name.
07:40
I wonder, which came first, the brand togs
07:43
or the word togs for swimming costumes.
07:45
I wonder, but yes for us swimming costume cozzie
07:48
it's now popular to call it a one piece as well
07:51
a one piece, but we say one piece.
07:54
And that means as opposed to a two piece, which is a bikini.
07:58
Okay next one.
07:59
- All right how do you tell someone not to worry?
08:02
So obviously you can say no worries.
08:05
That's a typical one that I think we probably
08:07
all use, Americans don't tend to use that.
08:10
You could also say in Australia English no dramas
08:13
no dramas mate oh, no dramas, no dramas
08:16
don't worry about it.
08:18
But the funny one is no wuckas.
08:21
- Oh, no worries cuz.
08:23
- I like the cuz some people in the UK
08:24
do you use the word cuz short for cousin.
08:27
I'm with Pete on no worries.
08:28
We also sometimes say no problem as well,
08:31
which is it seems to be slightly more US English.
08:34
One I really like is no biggie, no biggie.
08:37
It's not big deal no biggie don't worry, next.
08:42
- Festy that is something that I used to say
08:43
when I was a young nipper back at primary school
08:48
when I was a young kid, I would say something is festy
08:51
but adults don't tend to use that they'll say gross.
08:54
- Right, you could say something was rank
08:57
or sick or gross like oh, that's rank or oh sick
09:04
or yuck that's gross.
09:07
- Interesting, interesting because sick in the UK
09:11
has now turned into a slang positive term.
09:15
If something's really cool you're like that's sick.
09:18
That's amazing.
09:20
I remember that slang term coming in
09:22
because at first I misinterpreted it
09:24
and thought they meant gross as well.
09:26
We also use rank in the UK I've never heard festy before,
09:30
but it's very expressive one that I love is horrendous
09:36
that's absolutely horrendous I just think
09:41
it just says exactly what you wanted to say onto the next.
09:45
- We call them the salvos typically
09:50
and it's based on the salvation army,
09:53
a Christian group in Australia
09:54
that is renowned for having these stores
09:57
that you can buy secondhand things at, the salvos.
10:01
So I'm gonna go to the salvos and get some new jeans.
10:04
well secondhand jeans.
10:06
- We would say op shop.
10:08
- Ooh op shop that sounds great.
10:11
We're gonna be a bit boring here.
10:13
I can't really think of any slang terms that we have
10:18
for charity shops in the UK in British English.
10:22
I wonder if any of my fellow Brits can help me out.
10:25
Do we say anything else?
10:26
Nope, the charity shop.
10:27
It'd be cool if we shortened it down something like the,
10:30
the chaz or shaza but we don't keeping it formal.
10:35
Okay, next one.
10:37
- Yeah so I guess if you're taking the excessively
10:40
long routes somewhere, I would say to take the scenic route
10:44
taking the scenic route.
10:45
Yeah that's I don't if that's slang or not
10:48
but that's what we would say
10:49
we're taking the scenic route
10:51
- To take a tiki tour, a tiki tour.
10:56
- Oh, I love that a tiki tour amazing.
10:58
Now we're with Australia on this one
11:00
we say to take the scenic route as well onto the next.
11:04
- Okay, this one is clearly bush walking.
11:07
The bush in Australian slang or Australian English
11:11
is anywhere that is effectively forested
11:13
where there's a vegetation
11:15
and you're away from civilization.
11:17
There's no suburbia, there's no city you're in the bush.
11:20
If you're walking in the bush you're bush walking, right.
11:23
Makes sense, you could also be hiking,
11:25
but yes, bush walking is typically
11:27
what we would use when you go for walks,
11:30
whilst camping or out in the bush.
11:32
- Tramping, you definitely go on a tramp through the bush.
11:38
- Interesting, very interesting we definitely don't say bush
11:42
a bush refers to a small low tree.
11:47
If we're talking about something that isn't suburbia
11:49
we might say in the wilderness
11:51
but we're more likely to say countryside in the country.
11:55
If there are lots of trees
11:56
we're in a forest or the woods.
11:58
We do use the word hiking.
12:01
We also just choose the word walking or rambling as well.
12:06
Rambling, trumping sounds interesting
12:08
because trump is a derogatory term
12:11
for a homeless person or somebody who lives on the street.
12:14
So if I heard that somebody was tramping
12:16
I might think maybe they're living on the street.
12:20
So it's interesting that they use that word
12:22
but it does make sense
12:23
because you can tramp along and walk slowly.
12:27
Yeah, it makes sense, next one.
12:30
- So, if someone is getting very upset is crying
12:35
you could say that they're having a teary.
12:37
- To pack a sad, I'll go on and pack a sad.
12:41
- To pack a sad I love it and to have a teary.
12:45
In British English it's to throw a tantrum
12:48
or to throw a fit as well, next one.
12:52
- Yeah, so if you're kissing someone, your pashing them
12:56
and we would say, I remember being a teenager
12:59
when you would be making out with someone
13:01
and if you were doing it so much that you ended up with,
13:05
a bit of a rash, what do we call that pash rash.
13:08
- To pash oh, did you say them a pashing in the movies?
13:14
- Oh, my word
13:15
I have never heard that word before to pash.
13:18
If someone said fancier pash
13:20
I'd think it's like a pastry or something
13:22
and probably agree to it, which is worrying.
13:25
For us it's a snog or it is to get with
13:30
to get with someone is to kiss or to make out as well.
13:33
Which I think comes from us English.
13:36
I'm glad that I now have to pass in my vocabulary
13:39
to prevent future embarrassing situations, next one.
13:44
- How do you say to organise something?
13:46
So if I'm going to organise something
13:49
like a party and event, maybe we're gonna go out,
13:53
we're gonna go camping, I tee something up.
13:56
I tee something up I organise it.
13:59
- So this, we would say to tee something up
14:01
to tee something up.
14:04
- Oh cool that maybe say that we would never say that.
14:07
Oh, so they both say the same thing.
14:08
I can't say I've heard that used too much in the UK.
14:11
We would say to get something organised
14:14
I'll get something organised.
14:15
I'll get something sorted as well onto the next
14:19
- In Austria English
14:20
we have another heap of slang terms for the toilet.
14:25
Typically, if I was out and about
14:27
and I wanted to ask someone where their toilet was
14:30
I would probably avoid saying the word toilet
14:32
and instead say loo.
14:34
But if I was really wanting to be informal
14:37
I would say the word dunny.
14:40
I don't know where that comes from
14:41
but we say dunny quite a lot.
14:43
- So these aren't the prettiest words for obvious reasons.
14:45
We could say either the dunny (beep) or te reo
14:50
Māori we would say whare paku and whare paku
14:54
also means (beep)
14:57
- Thank you Rosie I will get some bleeps on that.
15:02
Interesting, yes we can say that shit house as well.
15:06
I've never heard of dunny before
15:08
and also faripaku we don't have that language in the UK
15:12
so that's really interesting to hear.
15:14
I think that's the Mali language.
15:16
We have various slag terms the loo is good
15:19
it's not rude at all.
15:20
We also have the bog, which is a kind of dirty word.
15:25
You wouldn't go to someone's house and say
15:27
can I use your bog?
15:28
Because it would imply that their toilet is dirty.
15:31
Another one we have is the lav
15:34
which is short for the laboratory, which is a very formal
15:37
and old fashioned word for the toilet.
15:39
One more is the WC, which is short for water closet.
15:43
No one says water closet anymore, but WC is quite common.
15:48
All right, last one.
15:49
Let's see what they have to say.
15:51
- Cactus oh man, I am cactus.
15:54
I am wrecked, I'm so tired.
15:58
- I'm stuffed.
16:01
- Interesting so I'm stuffed for me would mean
16:04
I'm so full of food I've eaten too much.
16:07
Cactus means nothing to me.
16:08
If someone says I'm cactus
16:10
I might think they haven't shaved or waxed in a while.
16:13
So they have spiky arms, legs
16:16
anywhere that you might want to wax.
16:19
Yeah I would be confused for us we say I'm knackered
16:24
or I'm shattered as well,
16:26
I'm knackered or I'm shattered.
16:28
Knackered is quite impolite
16:30
shattered is a little bit less impolite.
16:35
Right, that is it for today's video.
16:36
I really hope you enjoyed it
16:38
17 slang terms from New Zealand, Australia and the UK.
16:44
When our pronunciation video comes out,
16:46
I will of course publish it
16:48
in the description box down below.
16:50
Make sure you subscribe as well
16:51
because then it will come up in your feed.
16:53
Don't forget to download the free PDF
16:55
that goes along with this lesson.
16:57
All you've got to do is click
16:58
on the link in the description box.
16:59
You sign up to my email list
17:01
and I'll send it directly to your inbox.
17:03
And then you've signed up
17:04
for free weekly PDFs going forwards.
17:07
A huge thank you to Rosie
17:09
from "Not Even French" and Pete from "Aussie English"
17:13
their contribution to this video has been invaluable.
17:16
All of our details are down below
17:17
I really recommend checking out that channels.
17:19
Don't forget to connect with me on all of my social media.
17:22
I've got my Facebook, my Instagram and my website
17:25
englishwithlucy.co.uk, where I've got loads of lessons
17:29
and a fantastic free pronunciation tool.
17:33
You can click on any phoneme, any sound
17:35
or word would that sound in it and hear me pronounce it?
17:38
Ee, noo, yes, pretty fun.
17:44
I'm very, very happy with it.
17:45
If you'd like to improve your listening
17:47
and vocabulary skills, even further
17:49
then I have my blogging channel
17:51
where I upload fully subtitled videos
17:54
of my life here on a farm in English countryside
17:57
I will see you soon for another lesson, mwah.
18:00
(soft music)
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