30 Tough but Very Important Advanced English Phrases for Daily Use (+ Free PDF & Quiz)

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2021-04-07・ 36396

English with Lucy channel


Learn 30 tough but important advanced English phrases used by natives on a daily basis to expand and enrich your vocabulary. Download the free PDF and quiz here: http://bit.ly/PhrasesPDF. SPRING SALE on my British English Pronunciation Course: https://epiphanylanguagestudios.com/​ - Use code SPRING25 for a 25% discount! HURRY! Offer ends 14th April 2021 at midnight GMT! I’ll train you to read phonetic transcriptions, and produce each sound that comprises modern received pronunciation. I’ll also teach you how to implement the correct use of intonation, stress, rhythm, connected speech, and much more. We’ll compare similar sounds, and look at tricky topics like the glottal stop and the dark L. Technically, I need to mark this as an AD even though it is my own company so - AD :) Edited by La Ferpection: https://www.laferpection.com/​ Practice speaking: Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy​​​ (ad affiliate) MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Personal Channel: http://bit.ly/LucyBella​​ Instagram: @Lucy http://bit.ly/lucyinsta​​​​​​​​​ Website: https://englishwithlucy.co.uk

Instruction

Double-click on the English captions to play the video from there.

00:02
(gentle music)
00:10
- Hello, everyone, and welcome back to English with Lucy.
00:14
Today, I am going to teach you 30 tough
00:18
but important advanced phrases
00:20
that you can use to expand your vocabulary.
00:23
These are phrases that you can use in daily conversation.
00:27
They are advanced, they're at roughly C1 level,
00:31
but I think that you can use them in a natural
00:34
and confident way.
00:35
To further help your understanding and your learning,
00:38
I have created a free PDF for you to download
00:42
and it also includes a quiz,
00:45
so you can test your learning.
00:47
If you'd like to download that free PDF and quiz,
00:50
all you've got to do is click on the link
00:52
in the description box,
00:54
enter your name and your email address,
00:56
you sign up to my mailing list,
00:58
and I send the PDF and quiz directly to your inbox.
01:03
And then, every week after that,
01:05
you will get the PDF for my weekly lessons automatically.
01:10
So let's begin.
01:11
I'm going to give you the phrase.
01:13
I'm going to show you how to pronounce it
01:16
with a phonetic transcription.
01:18
I'll give you the meaning
01:19
and I will give you an example of the phrase in use.
01:24
These are all phrases that you'll hear native speakers say
01:27
on a regular basis,
01:29
but they're not necessarily things
01:31
that you learn in a textbook.
01:33
You have to learn them in context,
01:35
which is why I'm providing you with examples.
01:38
Number one, a fraction of, a fraction of.
01:43
A fraction of something is a small or tiny part
01:47
or amount of something.
01:49
An example, the plastic folders were a fraction of the price
01:53
of the leather ones.
01:55
That's a much more advanced way of saying cheaper.
01:58
A fraction of the price. (cash register ringing)
02:00
Number two is all things considered, all things considered.
02:06
This means taking everything into account.
02:09
All things considered,
02:10
I think we've done a really good job.
02:13
Number three has a similar meaning.
02:15
It's not exactly the same though.
02:17
It's all in all, all in all.
02:21
It means overall or mostly.
02:26
All in all, I think the response to the campaign
02:29
was very positive.
02:31
Number four is to be bound to, to be bound to.
02:35
Now, you might notice that I'm saying to,
02:38
but in the phonetic transcription, I've put tuh,
02:42
and previously I said of.
02:45
All of these phrases would typically be used
02:47
within a longer sentence.
02:49
So you would usually use the weak forms.
02:51
To be bound to something is to be certain to,
02:55
or to be destined to.
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An example, you're bound to hear back from them soon.
03:00
You're certain to hear back from them soon.
03:03
They will help you.
03:04
They're bound to help you.
03:06
It's a really common expression.
03:08
Number five is to be down to, to be down to.
03:14
This means to be as a result of.
03:17
For example, the drop in profit
03:20
was down to the bad weather over Christmas.
03:23
The drop in profit was as a result of the bad weather,
03:28
down to the bad weather. (wind howling)
03:31
I wonder what that was down to.
03:32
I wonder what that was as a result of.
03:35
It's a really nice phrase.
03:37
Number six is to drive somebody up the wall,
03:40
to drive someone up the wall.
03:42
And this is to annoy someone or to make them crazy.
03:46
My mum always used to say it to me,
03:48
"You're driving me up the wall, Lucy.
03:50
You're annoying me so much.
03:51
You're driving me crazy."
03:54
An example, people who throw their rubbish
03:57
out of their car window drive me up the wall.
04:01
No word of a lie.
04:03
Just today, I went on a run outside the farm
04:06
and someone had unloaded what looked like
04:09
the entirety of the day's litter from McDonald's.
04:13
It's always McDonald's, isn't it?
04:16
Number seven, a really nice one, I say this a lot,
04:18
it's easier said than done.
04:21
That's easier said than done.
04:23
This simply means not very easy.
04:26
If something isn't very easy,
04:27
it's easier to say it than it is to do it.
04:31
An example, I'd like to give our boss
04:33
some constructive criticism,
04:35
but that's easier said than done,
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meaning it's not very easy to criticise your boss.
04:41
Number eight is for the most part, for the most part.
04:45
This means usually, or in most cases.
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An example, I find running,
04:51
for the most part, very enjoyable,
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usually, in most cases, apart from when I fall over,
04:58
which is what I did the other day.
05:01
I got completely muddy.
05:02
My phone landed in a puddle.
05:04
It wasn't a good day, but for the most part,
05:07
I enjoy running.
05:08
Number 10 and number 11 go together.
05:10
We have number 10, which is in high spirits,
05:14
in high spirits,
05:15
which means in a cheerful or energetic mood.
05:19
For example, the winning team was in high spirits
05:23
after the award ceremony. (crowd cheering)
05:25
Then we have number 11, which is the opposite.
05:27
Can you guess what it is?
05:29
It's in low spirits, in low spirits.
05:32
And this means in a sad or fatigued,
05:37
despondent mood. (crowd moaning)
05:39
She was in low spirits due to her recent breakup.
05:43
This is a more advanced way
05:45
of saying someone's in a bad or a good mood.
05:48
Number 12 is just around the corner, just around the corner.
05:52
That actually makes sense.
05:53
Number 12 is just around the corner.
05:55
It's here now. (crowd cheering)
05:57
It means coming very soon.
06:00
If something is just around the corner,
06:02
it's coming very soon.
06:04
An example, I felt stressed when I realised my driving test
06:08
is just around the corner. (car honking)
06:10
Number 13 is to make a point of doing something,
06:15
to make a point of doing something.
06:18
And this is to always do something,
06:20
or to take particular care to do something.
06:24
An example, she always makes a point
06:26
of treating everyone as equals.
06:29
She always takes particular care
06:30
to make sure everyone is treated fairly.
06:33
Number 14 is to make ends meet, to make ends meet.
06:38
This means to earn enough money to live on,
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to earn just enough money to live.
06:43
An example, we always struggle to make ends meet
06:47
towards the end of the year.
06:50
We struggle to have enough money,
06:52
because Christmas is expensive.
06:54
Number 15 is to miss the point, to miss the point.
06:59
This means to fail to understand the essential
07:03
or important part of something.
07:05
I think you've completely missed the point there.
07:07
You haven't understood the important part
07:10
of what I was saying, you focused on something else.
07:13
Number 16 is narrow-minded, narrow-minded.
07:18
This means prejudiced,
07:20
or not willing to listen to the views of others.
07:23
An example, her father-in-law is extremely narrow-minded
07:27
and is unable to accept that it's no longer than 1900s.
07:32
Number 17 is on hand, on hand,
07:35
and this means present or available.
07:39
An example, the counsellor is always on hand
07:42
to offer a shoulder to cry on.
07:44
18 is on the face of it, on the face of it.
07:48
And this means apparently,
07:50
but without knowing all of the relevant facts.
07:54
An example, on the face of it,
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she seems to have settled in well.
07:57
I don't fully know, but it seems that she has.
08:00
Number 19 is on the verge of, on the verge of.
08:05
This means very near to doing something
08:08
or experiencing something.
08:09
And we nearly always use this with tears.
08:14
If someone's on the verge of tears,
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then they are nearly crying.
08:18
Number 20, this one is very popular,
08:21
people are liking this one at the moment.
08:23
It is part and parcel, part and parcel.
08:27
It's a great one. It's fun to say.
08:30
This means an essential or integral component.
08:34
For example, stress is part and parcel of this profession.
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It's an essential component.
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It wouldn't be this profession if it wasn't for stress.
08:44
I'm not talking about being a YouTuber.
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I'm thinking of professions such as being a nurse
08:50
or something like that.
08:52
Number 21 is to pose a question, to pose a question.
08:56
And this means to raise a question,
08:59
and it's commonly used in the phrase
09:01
this poses the question, this raises the question,
09:05
this brings up the query and topic.
09:09
An example, this poses the question,
09:12
should we be following the regulations?
09:14
Number 22 is remarkably complex.
09:18
Now, I'm not saying it is remarkably complex,
09:20
the phrase is remarkably complex.
09:23
It just works with the number.
09:27
This means very complicated with lots of intricate details.
09:31
These words just go together beautifully.
09:33
It's remarkably complex.
09:35
I love the word remarkably.
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An example, the mosaic was remarkably complex and beautiful.
09:42
23 is a roller coaster of emotions,
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a roller coaster of emotions. (screaming)
09:49
This means full of highs and lows, happiness, sadness,
09:53
fear, shock, everything.
09:55
An example, I experience a roller coaster of emotions
09:59
whenever I visit the opera, which is never.
10:02
I've never visited the opera.
10:03
I must do that post COVID.
10:07
Number 24, love this one.
10:09
I think you should use this at every opportunity.
10:11
It is short and sharp, short and sharp.
10:16
This means quick and concise, very brief.
10:19
An example, let's keep this Zoom meeting short and sharp,
10:23
quick and concise.
10:24
No one wants to be here,
10:25
so let's just make it quick and efficient.
10:28
Number 25 is to sit on the fence, to sit on the fence.
10:31
And this means to avoid making a decision or choice.
10:35
For example, she likes to sit on the fence
10:37
to avoid confrontation.
10:40
Number 26 is to steal the show, to steal the show.
10:45
This means to attract the most attention and praise.
10:49
For example, the last interviewee totally stole the show.
10:54
They received the most attention,
10:56
the best attention.
10:58
They created the best impression.
11:00
Number 27 is to take great pleasure in doing something.
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And this means to really enjoy doing something,
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sometimes at the expense of others.
11:13
You can also use the negative form.
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I take no great pleasure in doing this,
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if you want to express
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that you really don't get any enjoyment from doing something
11:21
that might negatively affect others.
11:24
An example, she took great pleasure
11:27
in telling him he was fired.
11:30
So she enjoyed breaking his heart, but you know,
11:33
maybe he did something bad.
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Maybe he deserved it.
11:36
Who knows, but she took pleasure in it.
11:40
Number 28 is to walk on eggshells, to walk on eggshells.
11:45
This means to be extremely cautious
11:48
about one's words or actions.
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If you walk on eggshells around somebody,
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it means you're choosing your words,
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you're desperately trying to not make them angry
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or to offend them.
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An example, the boss has a terrible temper,
12:02
so everyone walks on eggshells around him.
12:05
Number 29 is without a care in the world,
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without a care in the world.
12:10
And this means without any worries,
12:13
without worrying about anything.
12:15
An example, I am always anxious
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and there's my husband without a care in the world,
12:20
he never worries about anything.
12:22
Number 30, we made it.
12:24
It is worth your weight in gold,
12:27
or worth something's weight in gold.
12:29
If something or someone is worth their weight in gold,
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it means that they are very valuable,
12:36
helpful, or irreplaceable.
12:38
For example, we can't lose our receptionist,
12:41
she's worth her weight in gold.
12:42
She's amazing. She's so helpful and useful.
12:45
It is now time for you to complete the quiz.
12:48
So if you'd like to do that,
12:50
you've got to download the free PDF,
12:51
I've got everything we discussed today,
12:54
and the quiz questions.
12:55
And feel free to show off your results
12:58
in the comments section down below.
12:59
Just click on the link in the description box,
13:01
you enter your name and your email address,
13:04
you sign up to my mailing list,
13:06
I send the PDF directly to your inbox,
13:08
and then every week you will receive the PDF and quizzes
13:12
as soon as they're available, straight to your inbox.
13:15
So convenient.
13:17
If you're looking to improve your listening
13:19
and you want to expand your vocabulary,
13:22
I'd just like to remind you
13:23
that I also have my vlogging channel
13:25
where I vlog my life here on an English farm
13:28
in the countryside.
13:29
And every vlog is completely,
13:32
fully subtitled for your learning.
13:35
You can also connect with me on my social media.
13:37
I've got my Instagram, @Lucy,
13:39
and my wonderful website,
13:41
which has got a fantastic pronunciation tool.
13:43
It is englishwithlucy.co.uk.
13:47
I will see you soon for another lesson. Muah.
13:50
I don't know why this requires extra lipstick,
13:53
it's 'cause I mean business.
13:56
Where's my tiny hair brush? Here we are.
13:58
I think I've made that look worse.
14:00
I think you've completely missed the point there,
14:03
you haven't understood the important thing.
14:07
This means an essential or integral,
14:10
is it integral or integral?
14:12
It must be integral.
14:13
I'm thinking of the Spanish word
14:14
for whole grain, aren't I?
14:17
Integral.
14:19
- [Announcer] Integral.
14:21
Integral. Integral.
14:22
- Integral (beep).
14:23
I've spent my whole life saying integral.
14:25
No, integral. Let me search a different dictionary.
14:28
I don't always trust Cambridge.
14:29
- [Announcer] Integral. Integral.
14:32
- An example, let's keep this.
14:35
If you are looking for further listening practise
14:38
and you want to further expand your go, go, roar.
14:43
(gentle music)
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