British vs American vs Canadian ENGLISH Differences! (PART 2) (+ Free PDF & Quiz)

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2021-08-19・ 22097

English with Lucy channel


3 English teachers speak 1 language in 3 different ways! Do Canadians say 'aboot'? How do British people say 'water'? Do Americans say 'liddle' instead of 'little'? Download the free PDF: https://bit.ly/UkUsCanAccents Watch part 1 (vocabulary) here: https://bit.ly/USvsUKvsCAN A HUGE thanks to Bob and Rachel! Here is their information: Rachel's English - Subscribe to Rachel's channel here: https://bit.ly/RachelsYTChannel If you're especially interested in American English, Rachel also runs her own academy, https://www.rachelsenglishacademy.com/, which is packed with easy-to-understand, practical training resources. Bob the Canadian - Subscribe to Bob's channel here: https://bit.ly/BobsYTChannel If you're especially interested in Canadian English, Bob also has a fantastic website, http://bobthecanadian.com/, where you can find links to his podcast, his transcripts, and his second Youtube channel of awesome English phrases! DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE EMAILS FROM LUCY? Sign up here: https://bit.ly/EmailsFromLucy Don't forget to turn on subtitles if you need them! This is how I generate my subtitles (you can get a $10 subtitle coupon too): https://www.rev.com/blog/coupon/?ref=lucy (affiliate) Visit my website for free PDFs and an interactive pronunciation tool! https://englishwithlucy.co.uk​ MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Personal Channel: http://bit.ly/LucyBella​​​ (I post subtitled vlogs of my life in the English countryside! Perfect for listening practice!) Instagram: @Lucy http://bit.ly/lucyinsta​​​​​​​​​​ My British English Pronunciation Course is now LIVE: https://englishwithlucy.co.uk/pronunciationcourse (use code YOUTUBE10 for a 10% discount!) Do you want to improve your pronunciation? I have launched my British English (Modern RP) pronunciation course! I’ll train you to read phonetic transcriptions, and produce each sound that comprises modern received pronunciation. I’ll also teach you how to implement the correct use of intonation, stress, rhythm, connected speech, and much more. We’ll compare similar sounds, and look at tricky topics like the glottal stop and the dark L. Technically, I need to mark this as an AD even though it is my own company so - AD :) Want to get a copy of my English Vocabulary Planners? Click here: https://shop.englishwithlucy.co.uk - The best offer is the 4-book bundle where you get 4 planners for the price of 3. This product is very limited - don't miss out. The English Plan will be shipped from early August, from me here in England to you across the world! We ship internationally! Watch my explainer video here: https://bit.ly/TheEnglishPlanVideo Practice speaking: Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy... (ad affiliate) Improve listening! Free Audible audiobook: https://goo.gl/LshaPp If you like my lessons, and would like to support me, you can buy me a coffee here: https://ko-fi.com/englishwithlucy FREE £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa (ad - affiliate) Email for business enquiries ONLY: [email protected] Edited by La Ferpection: https://www.laferpection.com/​​

Instruction

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00:02
(lighthearted music)
00:10
- Hello everyone and welcome back to
00:11
"English with Lucy."
00:13
Today, I am bringing you part two
00:16
of my collaboration with Bob the Canadian
00:19
and Rachel from "Rachel's English."
00:22
We are doing a comparison of British English,
00:25
American English and Canadian English.
00:28
Last time, we looked at the difference in vocabulary
00:31
and today we're going to be looking at pronunciation.
00:36
Let me quickly introduce my two wonderful guests.
00:40
First up, we have Rachel from "Rachel's English."
00:43
- My name is Rachel
00:44
and I run the YouTube channel "Rachel's English,"
00:46
where we cover all things spoken English
00:49
with an emphasis on American English,
00:51
slang, the American accent, listening comprehension,
00:54
conversation skills and so on.
00:56
- And representing Canada we have Bob
01:00
from "Learn English with Bob the Canadian."
01:03
- Well hello Lucy and all of Lucy's viewers.
01:05
I'm Bob the Canadian from the YouTube channel,
01:07
"Learn English with Bob the Canadian,"
01:09
and I'm here today to read a few sentences for you
01:12
with my Canadian accent.
01:14
- If you've never met me before
01:15
my name's Lucy.
01:16
I run this channel, "English with Lucy"
01:18
and I come from Cambridgeshire in England
01:22
and I speak with a modern RP accent,
01:25
sometimes with a hint of Estuary.
01:27
I wonder if you can spot that ever.
01:29
As always, there is a free PDF
01:32
that goes along with today's lesson.
01:34
If you would like to download it,
01:36
all you've got to do is click on the link
01:37
in the description box.
01:39
You enter your name and your email address.
01:41
You sign up to my mailing list and the PDF will be sent
01:45
directly to your inbox
01:46
and then every week after that,
01:49
you will automatically receive all of my free PDFs,
01:53
along with my news, course information and updates.
01:57
Okay.
01:57
So how is it going to work today?
01:59
Well, I have got six groups of three sentences.
02:04
We're going to read them one after the other,
02:06
so you can immediately compare
02:09
the differences in how we pronounce things.
02:12
Let's get started.
02:14
So first up, we're going to have a look at my
02:16
"au" and "o" sounds.
02:19
These can be very different in American English
02:22
and Canadian English.
02:24
Have a listen.
02:25
I caught the cot.
02:27
- I caught the cot.
02:29
- I caught the cot.
02:31
- I caught the cot.
02:33
- I caught the cot.
02:35
- I caught the cot.
02:36
- Number two, the tot was taut.
02:40
- The tot was taut.
02:41
- The tot was taut.
02:43
- The tot was taut.
02:45
- The tot was taut.
02:46
- The tot was taut.
02:48
- And number three,
02:50
I bought a bot.
02:51
- I bought a bot.
02:52
- I bought a bot.
02:54
- I bought a bot.
02:55
- I bought a bot.
02:57
- I bought a bot.
02:59
- I bought a bot.
03:00
When I read these sentences,
03:01
I say both words the same way.
03:03
I caught the cot,
03:04
the tot was taut, I bought a bot.
03:07
- So that's really interesting.
03:10
Both of them pronounce in a really similar way.
03:12
I caught the cot. (laughs)
03:15
But for me, it's very, very different,
03:17
caught, cot.
03:19
Similar mouth shape.
03:21
One is much longer than the other.
03:24
Caught, cot,
03:26
caught, cot,
03:28
taught, tot,
03:30
bought, bot.
03:33
Listen to these next three.
03:35
This for me is "I" sound before an "r" sound.
03:41
Number one, borrow.
03:44
- Borrow.
03:46
- Borrow.
03:47
- Borrow.
03:47
- Borrow.
03:49
- Borrow.
03:50
- Number two,
03:52
sorry.
03:53
- Sorry.
03:55
- Sorry.
03:56
- Sorry.
03:57
- Sorry.
03:59
- Sorry.
03:59
- Number three,
04:01
tomorrow.
04:02
- Tomorrow.
04:03
- Tomorrow.
04:04
- Tomorrow.
04:06
- Tomorrow.
04:07
- Tomorrow.
04:08
- So all three of us sounds so different here.
04:10
I love Bob's "or."
04:12
It's like a really long one, sorry.
04:15
For me it's "oh," sorry. Sorry.
04:18
And Rachel's is more of "ah," sorry.
04:21
Sorry, sorry. Sorry.
04:24
(laughs)
04:25
It's so fun. This is why I love pronunciation.
04:28
It is so much fun.
04:30
- In particular the word, "sorry"
04:32
I pronounce with a very strong Canadian accent. I'm sorry.
04:37
(laughs)
04:38
- I'm sorry. Sorry.
04:39
Yeah. Yeah.
04:41
That's really distinctive
04:42
because before I started studying pronunciation,
04:46
I really struggled to tell the difference
04:48
between the American accents and the Canadian accents.
04:52
I wouldn't have been able to identify people.
04:55
The "or" sorry, sound for me,
04:58
makes that quite easy to differentiate.
05:01
I wonder if the whole of Canada
05:03
says it in that way
05:04
or if it's a particular region or generation.
05:08
In these next three,
05:09
we're going to have a look or listen to the flat "T."
05:12
Consider how I say the "t" sound
05:16
in the middle of words compared to how Rachel
05:18
and Bob say it.
05:20
Number one,
05:22
a little bit of butter.
05:24
- A little bit of butter.
05:26
- These are gonna be a bit challenging, even for me.
05:29
A little bit of butter.
05:30
- A little bit of butter.
05:32
- A little bit of butter.
05:34
- A little bit of butter.
05:35
- Number two.
05:36
It's wetter in Toronto.
05:39
- It's wetter in Toronto.
05:41
- It's wetter in Toronto.
05:42
- It's wetter in Toronto.
05:44
- It's wetter in Toronto.
05:46
- It's wetter in Toronto.
05:48
- So did you notice that Rachel
05:49
dropped the second T in Toronto. Toronto.
05:53
That's because in American English,
05:54
they sometimes drop the T
05:56
when it comes after an N.
05:59
Toronto, Toronto.
06:02
(laughs)
06:03
My American accent is just horrendous. (laughs)
06:09
Another good example of this is internet, for me.
06:12
For Americans, internet. Internet.
06:16
And number three,
06:17
I know a lot about it.
06:19
- I know a lot about it.
06:21
- I know a lot about it.
06:22
- I know a lot about it.
06:24
- I know a lot about it.
06:26
- I know a lot about it.
06:27
So you'll notice when I say Toronto,
06:30
I actually say Toronto.
06:31
So here we go again, a little bit of butter.
06:33
It's wetter in Toronto.
06:35
I know a lot about it.
06:36
- Okay, I feel like the odd one out here
06:38
because I do pronounce my T's in the middle of words.
06:42
Now, in British English,
06:44
we do use a glottal stop quite frequently.
06:47
If I were speaking really quickly with my friends, I might
06:52
drop the T in little and say little, little.
06:57
You might also hear a glottal stop, like little.
07:00
A little bit, a little bit.
07:02
It's a very soft glottal stop.
07:04
We don't tend to use the flap "T" as much
07:06
which is when you almost, and it's not exactly a D,
07:09
but it sounds very similar to a D, a little bit.
07:13
A little bit of butter.
07:14
It doesn't sound right in my accent
07:16
but it sounds perfectly fine in theirs.
07:18
It's curious that both of them say Toronto.
07:21
Bob almost completely skips a syllable there,
07:25
Toronto, Toronto.
07:27
For me, it's Toronto, Toronto.
07:30
(laughs)
07:31
- Love the flap "T".
07:32
It's so fun.
07:35
(laughs)
07:37
- I think the flap "T' is fun.
07:39
And do you know what, I am actually hearing the flap "T"
07:42
creeping into British English now.
07:45
And it seems to be a sort of posh thing.
07:48
I'm hearing sort of Midland upper class Londoners,
07:51
as it seems, based in Chelsea.
07:53
If you listen to "Made in Chelsea,"
07:55
that's a TV show about
07:58
young rich people in Chelsea.
08:00
They'll say, "Yeah, I think it's better. It's better."
08:03
But that was never really a thing in the past
08:05
to you use that flap "T."
08:07
Maybe it's cause they're, so well-traveled
08:09
that they go over to the States and Canada
08:11
and they've picked up that flap "T."
08:13
This next bundle will hopefully show
08:15
a bit of the British influence on Canadian English.
08:20
Have a listen.
08:21
Again and against.
08:23
- Again,
08:24
against.
08:26
Again and against.
08:29
- Again and against.
08:30
- Again and against.
08:32
- Again,
08:34
against.
08:36
Again and against.
08:38
- Again and against.
08:40
Like if the Toronto Maple Leafs
08:41
play a game against the Montreal Canadiens.
08:44
- Ah, so it's interesting that they both say,
08:46
"Again and against,"
08:48
whereas for me it is again and against.
08:52
You will also hear Brits saying, "Again and against."
08:55
I think that's something that we've picked up
08:56
from consuming so much American media.
08:59
Yeah, I think you'd find me using both actually,
09:02
with no real identifiable rhyme or reason.
09:06
Avenue.
09:08
- Avenue.
09:09
- Avenue.
09:10
- Avenue.
09:11
- Avenue.
09:13
- Avenue.
09:15
- Ah, so for me, it's avenue. New.
09:18
That's a big difference between British English
09:20
and American English.
09:22
They say new, we say new.
09:24
I was curious to hear what Bob had to say
09:27
because I have heard Canadians say new as well.
09:31
And the last one, adult.
09:34
- Adult.
09:35
- And adult.
09:36
- Adult.
09:37
- Adult.
09:38
- And adult.
09:39
So that's how I would say those again and against,
09:43
avenue and adult.
09:44
- Ah, so the stress on adult and adult is different for us.
09:48
For me, adult.
09:50
Go and tell an adult.
09:52
And for them it's go and tell an adult.
09:55
Adult, adult.
09:57
Okay, next we're going to have a look at how we all say
10:01
what I would say is the "ou" sound
10:04
because there's a common stereotype that the Canadians
10:07
pronounce it as about and Bob is going to show us
10:11
if that's true or not.
10:15
First up, out and about.
10:18
- Out and about.
10:20
- So you'll hear my Canadian accent fairly strongly again
10:23
in the following.
10:23
If I say out and about.
10:25
- Out and about.
10:27
- Out and about.
10:28
- Out and about.
10:30
- Next, how's the house?
10:32
- How's the house?
10:33
- How's the house?
10:34
- How's the house?
10:36
- How's the house?
10:37
- How's the house?
10:38
- And finally, the sound is too loud.
10:41
- The sound is too loud.
10:43
- The sound is too loud.
10:44
- The sound is too loud.
10:46
- The sound is too loud.
10:48
- The sound is too loud.
10:50
Some people think that Canadians say the word "about"
10:53
like "about," but we don't.
10:55
Here's a sentence so you can hear the difference,
10:57
"The man was out and about in his boat.'
11:00
It's a classic Canadian phrase
11:01
if you wanna hear a Canadian accent.
11:03
The man was out and about in his boat.
11:07
- The man was out and about in his boat.
11:09
I can definitely hear the difference between Rachel's accent
11:13
and Bob's accent there.
11:14
His is definitely more of a "ooh"
11:16
and hers is wider.
11:18
Mine seems to be wider still.
11:20
Out and about.
11:22
Our final group of words are words beginning with pro.
11:25
There are definitely some differences here.
11:28
First up process.
11:31
- Process.
11:32
- Process or process.
11:34
- Process.
11:35
- Process.
11:37
- So words like process or process,
11:39
they make me laugh a little bit
11:40
because I don't even know why I use two pronunciations.
11:44
I could say a sentence like this,
11:46
"the process for making bread is a very long process,"
11:49
and I pronounced the word two different ways.
11:51
I blame this mostly on the fact that Canadian English
11:54
is a blend of American and British English.
11:57
So the process was a long process.
11:59
Yeah. Weird, hey?
12:00
I don't even know why I choose one pronunciation
12:02
over the other.
12:04
- That's so interesting that he uses both.
12:06
I guess it's like again and again for us.
12:10
We use both and we don't really know why.
12:13
The next two are noun-verb pairs.
12:15
So first I'll say the noun, then I'll say the verb.
12:19
Project,
12:20
project.
12:22
You will have some people saying project instead of project.
12:26
- Project, project.
12:28
- You can work on a project. You can also work on a project.
12:31
- Project, project.
12:35
- Project, project.
12:37
- So with project,
12:38
I'm trying to figure out which pronunciation is most common.
12:41
Like you can work on a project.
12:43
You can also work on a project.
12:44
I think the first one is more common in Canadian English.
12:47
I think project is more common,
12:49
but we also have the verb form right, to project.
12:52
So as a student,
12:53
you can work on a project and then you can project
12:56
your project to the class using a projector.
12:59
Yeah, it gets a little confusing when you're Canadian.
13:01
I think we just go with the flow.
13:03
We just pick whatever pronunciation
13:04
makes the most sense at the time.
13:07
- Oh yes. So our pronunciation is very different there.
13:10
For me it's project, project.
13:13
And for Rachel it's more of "ah" sound. Project.
13:18
And the last one, progress to progress.
13:23
- Progress.
13:25
Progress.
13:26
- Progress and progress.
13:28
- Progress to progress.
13:31
- Progress.
13:33
Progress.
13:35
- Progress and progress.
13:37
- Same for Bob there as well. Progress.
13:40
Progress, project.
13:42
For me, project, progress.
13:47
Progress, sometimes as well.
13:49
Yeah, I think this has just made it clear
13:51
that we're not quite sure what we're doing.
13:52
(laughs)
13:53
- They're doing some road work actually
13:55
on my road this week
13:56
and I don't think they're making a lot of progress.
13:58
When I drive by,
13:59
I just don't think they're making a lot of progress
14:01
because they're usually just standing around.
14:04
So you can see once again, as a Canadian,
14:06
I say progress and I say progress.
14:08
I don't even know why I choose the pronunciations I do.
14:12
The words just come out,
14:13
either using one pronunciation, progress,
14:15
or the other, progress.
14:17
And then of course we have the verb as well, right,
14:19
to progress, which has another pronunciation entirely.
14:23
To progress.
14:24
- Right. That is it for today's pronunciation lesson.
14:27
I hope you enjoyed it and I hope you learned something.
14:30
Thank you so much
14:31
to Rachel and Bob for that invaluable contribution
14:35
to this video.
14:36
I've left all of their information
14:38
down below in the description box
14:39
so you can go and check out their channels
14:41
and their websites and everything.
14:44
Don't forget to download the free PDF
14:46
that comes with today's lesson.
14:48
It's got everything we've spoken about today.
14:51
If you'd like to download that,
14:52
just click on the link in the description box.
14:54
You enter your name and your email address,
14:56
and it will arrive directly in your inbox
14:59
along with all my other lessons
15:01
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15:03
and all of my offers, course information and updates.
15:06
Don't forget to connect with me on all of my social media.
15:08
I've got my website, englishwithlucy.co.uk
15:11
and my Instagram.
15:14
And on my website, I've got a really cool pronunciation tool
15:17
where you can click on all the phonemes
15:19
and hear me pronounce phonemes and words
15:21
that contain those phonemes.
15:23
It's very fun.
15:24
E.
15:27
Word.
15:29
No.
15:31
I've also got my personal channel
15:33
where I upload vlogs of my daily life here on a farm
15:36
in the English countryside
15:37
and all of them are subtitled
15:40
so you can use them to acquire more vocabulary
15:42
and to improve your listening as well.
15:44
I will see you soon for another lesson.
15:47
(blows a kiss)
15:49
(cheerful music)
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