British vs American vs Canadian ENGLISH Differences! (very different!) (+ Free PDF & Quiz)

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2021-08-11・ 114344

English with Lucy channel


English teachers Rachel and Bob join me today for this vocabulary and accent comparison video: US vs UK vs Canadian English words! Download the free PDF: https://bit.ly/VocabPDF WATCH PART 2 (pronunciation) HERE: https://bit.ly/UkUsCanACCENTS A HUGE thanks to Bob and Rachel! Here is their information: Rachel's English - Subscribe to Rachel's channel here: https://bit.ly/RachelsYTChannel If you're especially interested in American English, Rachel also runs her own academy, https://www.rachelsenglishacademy.com/, which is packed with easy-to-understand, practical training resources. Bob the Canadian - Subscribe to Bob's channel here: https://bit.ly/BobsYTChannel If you're especially interested in Canadian English, Bob also has a fantastic website, http://bobthecanadian.com/, where you can find links to his podcast, his transcripts, and his second Youtube channel of awesome English phrases! DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE EMAILS FROM LUCY? Sign up here: https://bit.ly/EmailsFromLucy Don't forget to turn on subtitles if you need them! This is how I generate my subtitles (you can get a $10 subtitle coupon too): https://www.rev.com/blog/coupon/?ref=lucy (affiliate) Visit my website for free PDFs and an interactive pronunciation tool! https://englishwithlucy.co.uk​ MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Personal Channel: http://bit.ly/LucyBella​​​ (I post subtitled vlogs of my life in the English countryside! Perfect for listening practice!) Instagram: @Lucy http://bit.ly/lucyinsta​​​​​​​​​​ My British English Pronunciation Course is now LIVE: https://englishwithlucy.co.uk/pronunciationcourse (use code YOUTUBE10 for a 10% discount!) Do you want to improve your pronunciation? I have launched my British English (Modern RP) pronunciation course! I’ll train you to read phonetic transcriptions, and produce each sound that comprises modern received pronunciation. I’ll also teach you how to implement the correct use of intonation, stress, rhythm, connected speech, and much more. We’ll compare similar sounds, and look at tricky topics like the glottal stop and the dark L. Technically, I need to mark this as an AD even though it is my own company so - AD :) Want to get a copy of my English Vocabulary Planners? Click here: https://shop.englishwithlucy.co.uk - The best offer is the 4-book bundle where you get 4 planners for the price of 3. This product is very limited - don't miss out. The English Plan will be shipped from early August, from me here in England to you across the world! We ship internationally! Watch my explainer video here: https://bit.ly/TheEnglishPlanVideo Practice speaking: Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy... (ad affiliate) Improve listening! Free Audible audiobook: https://goo.gl/LshaPp If you like my lessons, and would like to support me, you can buy me a coffee here: https://ko-fi.com/englishwithlucy FREE £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa (ad - affiliate) Email for business enquiries ONLY: [email protected] Edited by La Ferpection: https://www.laferpection.com/​​

Instruction

Double-click on the English captions to play the video from there.

00:02
(upbeat music)
00:10
- Hello everyone and welcome back to "English with Lucy".
00:14
I've got a great video planned for you today.
00:16
We are going to be comparing British English
00:19
with American English and Canadian English.
00:23
And I have two fabulous guests on my channel
00:27
and I think you might recognise them.
00:30
- Hey, my name is Rachel, I'm from the US
00:32
and I have a channel here on YouTube
00:34
where I focus on all things, spoken English
00:37
with an American accent.
00:39
My accent is what I would call a standard American accent.
00:43
I grew up in Florida, I went to school in the Midwest
00:46
and since then I've lived in Boston,
00:49
New York and Philadelphia.
00:51
- So we have Rachel representing the US
00:54
and representing Canada, we have Bob the Canadian.
01:00
- Well, hello Lucy and hello Rachel
01:02
and hello to all of Lucy's viewers.
01:04
I'm Bob the Canadian from the YouTube channel,
01:06
"Learn English with Bob the Canadian" where
01:09
you'll often find me out somewhere on my farm,
01:11
teaching a short English lesson.
01:14
- If you haven't met me before my name's Lucy,
01:17
I run this channel, "English with Lucy"
01:19
and I am from Cambridgeshire in the United Kingdom
01:22
and I speak with a modern RP accent.
01:26
I'd just like to remind you that there's a free PDF
01:28
that goes with this lesson.
01:30
It's got everything that we're going
01:31
to talk about today plus a quiz at the end.
01:35
If you'd like to download the free PDF,
01:37
all you've got to do is click on the link in
01:39
the description box, enter your name and your email address.
01:43
You then sign up to my mailing list
01:45
and the PDF will arrive automatically in your inbox.
01:48
From then on you don't have to subscribe again.
01:51
Every week you'll receive all of my lesson PDFs,
01:54
plus all of my news and offers.
01:56
By the way, this is a two-part video.
01:58
Today, we are looking at vocabulary and in the future,
02:01
there will be a part two with pronunciation
02:04
where we will definitively find out
02:07
if Canadians say about or not.
02:11
Okay, so I have sent Bob and Rachel a list of pictures
02:16
and they are going to tell us how they say it
02:18
where they're from because there are going
02:20
to be some differences.
02:22
Let's get started with this first one.
02:25
- This first one is definitely the letter Z.
02:27
Although as a child, we watched the American version
02:30
of Sesame Street and they tried to get me
02:32
to learn it as the letter Z.
02:34
But this in Canada is definitely the letter Z.
02:37
X, Y, Z.
02:39
- I would definitely call this letter Z.
02:44
- Interesting.
02:45
For me in the UK and British English,
02:47
it is the letter Z as well.
02:51
I really relate to Bob on that one because we used
02:53
to watch loads of TV shows and cartoons
02:57
that were produced in the US and they always used
02:59
to say Z as well and I remember finding it quite confusing
03:03
but yeah, X, Y, Z, over here.
03:06
Okay, let's take a look at this next one.
03:09
What would they call this?
03:12
- So this is definitely a bill in Canadian English.
03:15
When you're at a restaurant and when you're done eating,
03:17
you ask your server if you can have the bill.
03:20
- The check is the most common
03:22
but I would also call this the bill.
03:24
- In UK this is always the bill.
03:28
Can I have the bill?
03:29
And funny story, I worked as a waitress
03:32
when I was a teenager and someone once said to me,
03:34
"Can I have the bill?"
03:36
But I misread their lips and I thought they said,
03:38
"Can I have some milk?"
03:40
And I brought them a glass of milk
03:42
and they were just so confused.
03:45
Okay, onto the third, what would you call this?
03:48
And remember that you can write in the comment section below
03:51
what you would call these as well
03:52
if you say something different.
03:55
- So we call these either running shoes
03:57
or runners in Canadian English.
03:59
If you're gonna go out for a walk or a run,
04:01
you put on your running shoes or you put on your runners.
04:05
- There are lots of different terms I might use for this,
04:07
tennis shoes or running shoes,
04:09
even though they might not specifically be
04:11
for tennis or running.
04:13
Also sneakers.
04:16
- Interesting.
04:17
We don't use any of those words in the UK.
04:19
We understand them, sneakers, running shoes,
04:23
tennis shoes, but I would say that running shoes
04:25
would be specifically for running.
04:27
In general, we call these shoes trainers, trainers.
04:32
Okay, onto the next.
04:34
- A long time ago in Canadian English we called
04:36
this a Chesterfield but now we just call it a couch.
04:39
Sometimes we might say sofa but usually
04:42
when we see something like this we say,
04:44
"I'm gonna go sit on the couch."
04:46
- I would call this either a couch or a sofa.
04:50
- Funny, okay, so we would hardly ever call this a couch.
04:54
That sounds very American and Canadian to me.
04:58
We would almost always call this a sofa
05:01
or sometimes a settee.
05:03
A Chesterfield to me seems like an old fashioned
05:07
leather sofa, specific design.
05:10
we do have a lot of Americanisms in British English
05:14
and we would say a couch potato, not a sofa potato
05:18
that doesn't work.
05:21
If someone's lazy, they're a couch potato
05:22
so we have adopted that.
05:25
Okay, onto the next one.
05:27
- The $1 coin in Canada has a looney on it.
05:30
That's a bird that lives in Northern Canada.
05:33
So we decided we would just call this the looney.
05:36
Then when we decided to have a $2 coin,
05:38
we thought we would call it a tooney 'cause it's worth $2
05:41
and it rhymes with looney.
05:44
- Slang for $1, a buck.
05:47
- I love the looney and then the tooney.
05:50
I think that's absolutely hilarious.
05:52
Yeah, I've heard of buck before.
05:54
So we don't have dollars in the UK.
05:56
We have pounds and our slang term for one pound is a quid.
06:02
And we haven't thought of a cool name for two.
06:04
We call it two quid.
06:06
One quid, two quid.
06:07
Another thing to note is when we have five pounds
06:09
or five quid, we'll call it a fiver and for 10, a tenner.
06:16
- In Canada, we would call this pop.
06:17
I think it's the second half of the word soda pop.
06:20
I think my American cousins use the first part of the word.
06:23
I think they call it soda but we just call it pop.
06:26
- Actually in the US we use either soda
06:29
or pop depending on the region.
06:32
I personally use soda.
06:34
- Interesting, okay.
06:36
So there are definitely some clear similarities between
06:40
those two unsurprisingly.
06:42
In the UK it's very different.
06:44
You will find some people, I think more up north saying pop,
06:50
but in general we call it fizzy drinks
06:52
which doesn't sound as cool.
06:54
Now, the word soda to us is quite confusing because a soda
06:58
for us is fizzy water.
07:00
So I remember going over to the US and I was offered a soda
07:04
and I thought, oh, how boring.
07:07
No, I'll have something more interesting like a Coke please.
07:10
Okay, onto the next one.
07:12
- In Canada, we use the metric system
07:14
so we measure distance in kilometres,
07:16
but that seems like a really big word.
07:18
So sometimes we just say clicks.
07:20
If you ask someone, "How do I get to Niagara Falls?"
07:22
They might say, "Oh, it's about 40 clicks from here."
07:24
Sometimes it's spelled with a C sometimes with a K.
07:28
- I would call that one kilometre.
07:30
But of course in the US we're much more familiar with miles.
07:34
- So we're quite boring here.
07:35
We would just call it a kilometre,
07:37
but sometimes when we're running or doing sport,
07:40
we would just shorten that down to K.
07:42
So I love running and I like to run a 5K and 10K,
07:46
five kilometres, 10 kilometres.
07:48
I've never heard of click before, that's quite cool.
07:51
For driving we do still tend to use miles.
07:54
Our speed is in miles per hour.
07:57
How weird is that?
07:58
I go running in kilometres but I drive in miles.
08:02
We need to sort that out.
08:04
All right, let's talk about this one.
08:06
This is what I actually celebrated this weekend
08:09
that's just gone past.
08:11
- In Canadian English we would call this either a stag
08:14
and doe or a jack and jill.
08:15
It's a party that a couple has about a month
08:18
or two before their actual wedding,
08:19
where they just invite friends and family over just
08:21
to have a good time to celebrate the fact
08:24
that they're getting married.
08:26
- That would be a bachelor party for a man,
08:28
a bachelorette party for a woman.
08:31
- Ah, it's completely different in the UK.
08:35
We say hen do.
08:37
A do is a party or a stag do.
08:41
Now, it's more common for them to be more than one night.
08:43
People like to go away for weekends.
08:46
But if it's just one night you can say hen night
08:48
or stag night as well.
08:50
Also it's not so common to celebrate them together
08:52
as Bob explained but it is becoming more common.
08:55
And we put stag and hen together and we call it a sten,
08:59
hag didn't sound so good.
09:03
Okay, this next one is an interesting one
09:05
and I kind of just put it in for Bob.
09:08
Let's see what he says.
09:10
- Canadians often add the word eh to the end of a sentence
09:13
to turn it into a question.
09:14
So I can't really explain how it works
09:17
but I'll give you a few examples.
09:18
I could say it's nice day out here eh?
09:21
Or I could say it's getting hot out here eh?
09:23
Or if it was getting a bit windy,
09:24
I could say it's getting windy out here eh?.
09:26
All of those would be examples of how Canadians use
09:29
the word eh?.
09:31
- A common question tag in the US would be, right?
09:35
- Yes, I just wanted to hear Bob eh.
09:37
I know it's a common stereotype that, well,
09:40
there's two that I've heard of Canada
09:41
that they say about.
09:43
In British English we do use eh sometimes, eh, eh?
09:48
Or isn't it or doesn't it we do say a lot.
09:51
It's hot, isn't it?
09:53
Sometimes we can shorten this down to innit.
09:56
It's hot init?
09:57
Oh my God, init?
09:59
Doesn't it can go to done it, has done it.
10:02
I've heard them say right a lot in American English.
10:05
That's definitely creeping into British English
10:08
because we just consume so much American media.
10:12
- So Canada is a pretty big country and in different parts,
10:15
I think they have different words for this.
10:18
We call them smokes.
10:19
In some parts of Canada they might call them darts.
10:22
But most people I think just call them cigarettes.
10:25
- I don't smoke so I'm not super familiar here
10:27
but I would say cigarettes or for shorter
10:30
or for slang, ciggies or smokes.
10:34
- So smokes sounds very very American gangster film to me.
10:39
In British English, cigarettes or ciggies.
10:43
We also use the word fag which if you use it
10:45
to describe a person it's a really offensive word
10:48
but it's a common slang term for cigarettes.
10:51
Okay, onto the next, what do you call this?
10:56
- So these are what we call freezies.
10:58
You buy them in the store and they're not frozen.
11:00
When you come home you put them in the freezer
11:02
and in a couple of days they're frozen
11:04
and then on a hot day, kids can take them out,
11:06
snip the end off with a pair of scissors
11:08
and eat it to cool off.
11:10
- I call this a Popsicle.
11:12
- Okay, so yeah, we're definitely call in British English
11:15
this a Popsicle but we would also call it a lolly.
11:21
Any kind of frozen treat that isn't creamy,
11:24
we'd call a lolly.
11:25
If it's creamy, it's an ice cream.
11:27
- So in Canada we would call this homo milk or whole milk.
11:31
Homo is short for homogenised.
11:33
I think they mix the milk and the cream together
11:35
so it won't separate any more.
11:37
So this in Canada would be either homo milk or whole milk.
11:41
- That would be whole milk.
11:44
- Ah, okay.
11:45
So if someone asks me for homo milk,
11:48
I would not know what they're talking about.
11:50
I would understand whole milk but in UK we tend
11:53
to call it full fat milk or full cream milk.
11:57
And I think with the fat removed is skimmed
11:59
or semi-skimmed which is half and half.
12:01
Also I forgot to ask Bob, if it's true
12:04
that his milk comes in bags.
12:06
I've heard that in Canada milk comes in bags.
12:10
Okay, next one.
12:11
What are they going to call this?
12:14
- So we would call this either a parking garage
12:16
or a parkade.
12:17
When you go to see a show in a city like Toronto,
12:19
you park your car in a parking garage or in a parkade.
12:23
- I would call this a parking garage.
12:26
- For me, this is a multi-storey car park.
12:30
We do have a habit of over-complicating things, yeah.
12:34
One thing I've noticed is that in
12:36
the US they call it a parking lot.
12:38
We always call this a car park.
12:41
And if it has multiple levels, it's a multi-storey car park.
12:45
I would definitely understand parking garage
12:47
or garage as we would call it.
12:49
But if someone said parkade I would think
12:52
that might be like a mix between a park
12:55
and an arcade which sounds so fun and I would be
12:58
so bitterly disappointed when I get there
13:00
and it's a multi-storey car park.
13:03
All right, onto the next one.
13:04
What do you call this?
13:06
- So we would call this a washroom in Canada.
13:09
I still remember one of my first visits
13:11
to the US when I asked someone
13:13
if I could use their washroom and they looked at me funny
13:15
because I think they call it a bathroom there,
13:17
but in Canada, this is definitely a washroom.
13:20
- I would call this a bathroom
13:21
or we would also say restroom.
13:24
- Interesting.
13:25
In British English, we'd understand washroom
13:28
and restroom and bathroom of course but we tend
13:32
to call it the loo or just simply the toilet.
13:36
Bathroom to me implies that it has a bath and a shower.
13:41
So a public bathroom, well, I don't wanna have a shower
13:45
or a bath in a public bath.
13:48
You will often see toilets or public restrooms in
13:52
the UK marked with WC.
13:54
This is short for water closet
13:56
but no one ever says water closet.
13:58
We always say the loo or the toilets.
14:00
Where are the toilets, where's the toilet?
14:02
So my friends from across the pond have said
14:04
that they find saying the word toilet directly quite vulgar.
14:08
And I do understand that but it's just
14:09
so ingrained into our everyday speech.
14:13
Right, let's take a look at this next one.
14:16
What did they say?
14:17
- We would call this either a fire hall or a fire station.
14:20
Fire hall is the place where you would find firefighters
14:23
and fire trucks.
14:24
And if there's a fire, the alarm goes off
14:26
and they jump in their trucks and they go
14:28
to put out the fire.
14:28
So we would call it a fire hall or a fire station.
14:32
- Fire station but also firehouse.
14:36
- Interesting.
14:36
For us, this is just a fire station.
14:39
We never ever say fire hall or what was
14:42
the other one, fire house.
14:44
No, we never say that, fire station.
14:46
Actually, I've just thought there's a bar in London called
14:49
the Chiltern Firehouse which is meant to be very nice.
14:52
Actually, it's very nice I've been there.
14:54
And yeah, I never even thought twice about that.
14:56
Maybe we do say firehouse every now and again.
14:59
All right, onto the next one, what do they say for this?
15:02
- In Canada we often refer to electricity as hydro.
15:05
Sometimes there's a storm and the hydro goes out.
15:08
The poles along the road are called hydro poles.
15:10
So I think this is because a lot of our electricity comes
15:14
from hydro electric power plants.
15:16
But in Canada, you call electricity hydro.
15:19
- We call that electricity.
15:23
- Interesting.
15:25
Because if you said the hydro wasn't working I would presume
15:28
that was your water supply.
15:31
In British English we call this electricity, the electric.
15:34
We also say the power so we have a power cut
15:37
or the power has gone out or energy.
15:40
My energy bill's gone up so much.
15:41
This is because we use lots of different sources
15:45
as gas in many houses.
15:47
Oil is what we use here.
15:49
It depends if you're on the mains supply or not.
15:53
Okay, what do they call this?
15:56
- So we would call this either brown bread
15:58
or whole wheat bread.
16:00
It's more common for me as an older Canadian
16:02
to call it brown bread.
16:03
I think for my kids they would call this whole wheat bread.
16:06
But definitely when I was growing up,
16:08
we had white bread and we had brown bread.
16:11
- I would call that whole wheat bread.
16:13
- I'm definitely seeing more similarities
16:15
between Canadian English and British English
16:18
than American English and British English.
16:20
We also call this brown bread.
16:23
Multi-grain and whole wheat is also creeping in
16:26
but in general we have brown bread, white bread.
16:29
Okay, what did they say for this one?
16:32
- Sometimes when you're at a restaurant you get a little bit
16:35
of food on your mouth and you use a serviette
16:37
to wipe it off.
16:38
So this is what we in Canada would call a serviette.
16:42
- That's a paper napkin.
16:44
- Ah, interesting.
16:45
In British English we use both serviette and napkin.
16:49
For me a serviette seems like a kind of cheaper white one
16:54
that's disposable and a napkin is either decorated
16:58
or made of material.
17:00
Right, let's see what they say for this one.
17:03
- We call a case of beer with 24 bottles
17:05
in it a two-four in Canada.
17:07
Did you get it?
17:08
There's 24 bottles of beer in it, two-four.
17:11
So we call a case of beer with 24 bottles
17:13
of beer in it a two-four.
17:15
- We would call that a case of beer.
17:18
- In British English we would call this a 24 pack.
17:22
If someone asks me for a two-four, I don't think I'd know
17:26
what they're talking about but I like that,
17:28
that's very efficient.
17:30
Right, that is it for today's video.
17:33
Thank you so much to Bob and Rachel
17:35
for their fantastic explanations
17:38
and for generously participating in this video.
17:41
I've left all of their information down below in
17:44
the description box.
17:45
You can also click on the link there
17:46
to get your free PDF today's lesson.
17:49
Don't forget to connect with me on all of my social media.
17:52
I've got my Instagram and I've got
17:53
my website englishwithlucy.co.uk,
17:57
where I've got a really cool pronunciation tool.
18:00
You can click on all the phonemes
18:01
and hear how words are pronounced in British English.
18:04
- [Announcer] E, no, A.
18:07
- If you're looking for more listening practise
18:10
and to expand your vocabulary, then I also have
18:13
my vlogging channel where I document my life
18:16
here on a farm in the English countryside.
18:18
All of the vlogs are fully subtitled for your convenience
18:22
so you can pick up lots of vocab and improve your listening.
18:26
I will see you soon for another lesson.
18:30
(upbeat music)
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