You MUST NOT confuse these words! E.g. Luggage or Baggage? (+ Free PDF & Quiz)

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2020-12-16・ 16762

English with Lucy channel


You no longer need to confuse pairs/triplets of words like luggage & baggage, dessert & desert and stationary and stationery! Download free PDF here: https://bit.ly/freePDF15. The first 1000 to use the link will get a free trial of Skillshare Premium Membership: https://skl.sh/englishwithlucy12201 Ad - Thank you to Skillshare for sponsoring this video On the PDF there is a quiz :) WATCH PART 1 HERE: https://youtu.be/znoeHzG1vqY WATCH PART 2 HERE: https://youtu.be/zQBx-uU7F7U DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE EMAILS FROM LUCY? Sign up here: https://bit.ly/EmailsFromLucy Don't forget to turn on subtitles if you need them! This is how I generate my subtitles (you can get a $10 subtitle coupon too): https://www.rev.com/blog/coupon/?ref=lucy (affiliate) Visit my website for free PDFs and an interactive pronunciation tool! https://englishwithlucy.co.uk​ MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Personal Channel: http://bit.ly/LucyBella​​​ (I post subtitled vlogs of my life in the English countryside! Perfect for listening practice!) Instagram: @Lucy http://bit.ly/lucyinsta​​​​​​​​​​ My British English Pronunciation Course is now LIVE: https://englishwithlucy.co.uk/pronunciationcourse (use code YOUTUBE10 for a 10% discount!) Do you want to improve your pronunciation? I have launched my British English (Modern RP) pronunciation course! I’ll train you to read phonetic transcriptions, and produce each sound that comprises modern received pronunciation. I’ll also teach you how to implement the correct use of intonation, stress, rhythm, connected speech, and much more. We’ll compare similar sounds, and look at tricky topics like the glottal stop and the dark L. Technically, I need to mark this as an AD even though it is my own company so - AD :) Want to get a copy of my English Vocabulary Planners? Click here: https://shop.englishwithlucy.co.uk - The best offer is the 4-book bundle where you get 4 planners for the price of 3. This product is very limited - don't miss out. The English Plan will be shipped from early August, from me here in England to you across the world! We ship internationally! Watch my explainer video here: https://bit.ly/TheEnglishPlanVideo Practice speaking: Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy... (ad affiliate) Improve listening! Free Audible audiobook: https://goo.gl/LshaPp If you like my lessons, and would like to support me, you can buy me a coffee here: https://ko-fi.com/englishwithlucy FREE £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa (ad - affiliate) Email for business enquiries ONLY: [email protected] Edited by Connor - [email protected]

Instruction

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00:09
Everyone. And welcome back to English With Lucy. Today I am going to teach you how to
00:15
correctly use 10 pairs of really confusing words. These are words that both learners
00:23
of English and seasoned speakers of English get wrong, words like luggage and baggage.
00:30
They mean the same thing, but we use them in different ways sometimes. What about stationary
00:36
and stationary? Pronounced in the same way, but again, different uses. What is the difference
00:43
between complicated and complex? Is there a difference? And how should we use beside
00:52
or besides? All of this will be covered in this lesson. Before we get started, I would
01:00
like to thank the sponsor of today's video, it is Skillshare, which is an online learning
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community with thousands of inspiring classes for lifelong learners. There are so many classes
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It's called Plants at Home: Uplift Your Spirit & Your Space by Christopher Gryphon. Skillshare
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is curated specifically for learning, meaning there are no ads and they are always launching
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new premium classes. It's less than $10 per month with an annual subscription. The first
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1000 of my students to click on the link in the description box will get a free trial
01:49
of premium Skillshare membership. What are you waiting for? Let's get started with the
01:55
lesson. Ah, important. I nearly always forget to say this, but I have created a free PDF
02:02
for this entire lesson. It's got all of the vocabulary, the pronunciation, the explanations,
02:07
and the examples. If you would like to download that PDF for free, click on the link in the
02:13
description box. You enter your email address, sign up to our mailing list and it will be
02:18
sent directly to your inbox. There is also a quiz in the PDF, which I think you will
02:23
really like.
02:24
Number one, luggage or baggage. So luggage and baggage are quite unusual because they
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are near perfect synonyms of each other. Both of them mean suitcases or other bags in which
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to pack your personal belongings for travel. "Check in your luggage at the desk." "Pick
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up your baggage from the carousel." They mean the same thing, however, baggage has several
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additional meanings, which luggage does not have. There is also a slight preference of
03:00
baggage in American English and luggage in British English. But this is not enormous.
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We use both. Baggage can be used to describe things that make progress or freedom more
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difficult. So it's kind of saying that you're carrying around a virtual suitcase with you.
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It's much harder to go through life carrying a huge burden, for example, emotional baggage.
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If somebody has a lot of emotional issues that they're carrying around with them, that
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prevents progress or impedes them. An example, "I love him, but I don't think it will work.
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He has too much baggage." This baggage could mean lots of things. It could mean maybe he
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has children, maybe he has a difficult ex-partner. You can use your imagination for that one.
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We can not use luggage for this. It's only baggage in this case. If I say "He sounds
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perfect. Does he have any baggage?" I'm not asking if he has any suitcases. I'm asking
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if he has anything negative, anything he's carrying with him.
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Number two, we have stationary and stationery, both pronounced in the same way, but spelled
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differently. We have stationary with A-R-Y, which means to not be moving or not intended
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to be moved. And we have stationary with E-R-Y, which means office supplies basically, files,
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pencils, envelopes, paper, uncomfortable noun. Have a look at these sentences. When you hear
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them, you can only tell the difference through context because stationery E-R-Y is a noun
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and stationary A-R-Y is an adjective. When you see them written down, it's more clear.
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The van that was carrying the office stationery crashed into a stationary vehicle. Or, "You
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remain stationary and I'll go and pick up the stationery."
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Number three, we have desert and dessert. So they only differ in one extra S in dessert,
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but the pronunciation is different. The stress is on a different syllable in each desert,
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dessert. A desert is a large area of land that's very dry and has no water because it's
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dry and very few plants. A dessert is a sweet food eaten typically at the end of a meal.
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Okay, which spellings am I referring to in these two separate sentences? Number one,
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have you ever licked a desert? And number two, this desert is dry. Okay. I was just
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trying to confuse you then. The first one is desert, as in a dry place. Have you ever
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licked a dry place, a desert? And this dessert pudding, sweet food is dry. That's valid.
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A dessert could be very dry. Give yourself a pat on the back if you've gotten that right.
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Number four, we have beside and besides. So beside is a preposition, meaning next to something.
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I sat beside him all night long. And besides can be both a preposition and an adverb as
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well. The preposition means in addition to, or apart from. An example, "We have lots of
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things in common besides football," apart from football, in addition to football. Besides
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as an adverb is used for making an extra comment, which adds to what you have just said. An
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example, "I don't want to go to the concert. Besides, I've lost my ticket." That extra
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comment adds to what I had previously said.
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Number five, we have capitol and capital, pronounced in the same way, but with different
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spellings. So capital with A-L means the most important city in a region or country. For
07:01
example, London is the capital of England. Capital O-L is a building in each US state.
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And I think there's one called the Capitol in Washington as well, which is more specific,
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where politicians meet to work on new laws. So you can see how they could be confused.
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An example, "They met in the Capitol to discuss the new legislations." Capitol O-L could be
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confused for the capital city. You just have to see it written down, or you need to know
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the context.
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Number six, we have to aspire and to inspire. I like that group of vowels. Ire. Inspire,
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aspire. Nice. To aspire is to have a strong desire. Ooh, lovely vowel sound. To achieve
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something or to become something. For example, "She aspired to become an Olympic gymnast."
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To inspire is to give someone else the confidence, desire, or enthusiasm to do something well.
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An example, "You inspired me to pursue a career in scientific research."
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Number seven, we have breath and breathe. So different consonant sound at the end. Breath,
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breathe. Same mouth shape, same tongue position, but the second one has voice. So breath is
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the noun and that describes the air that you take into your lungs and then exhale again.
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An example, "Your breath smells of garlic." Not what you want to hear. Well, it means
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you've had the opportunity to eat garlic. I love garlic. To breathe, on the other hand
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is a verb. It describes the same thing, to take into your lungs and to breathe it out
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again. An example, "Don't breathe on me after eating garlic."
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Number eight, we have complicated and complex. In many situations, these can be used interchangeably,
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but sometimes they can't. And a good way to think of this is that complicated is the opposite
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of easy, and complex is the opposite of simple. An example, "The project is very complicated.
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I'll try and explain it later." Or complex, "The design of the tapestry is very complex."
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It's not necessarily difficult to understand, it's just not simple.
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Number nine, we have presume and assume. So we have presume with the zzz sound and assume
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with the ss sound. Zz has voice, ss has no voice. So these are synonyms. Both imply to
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take something for granted without fully understanding. Both mean to take something as true. But one
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implies more confidence. So with presume you are making an informed guess based on some
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sort of evidence. And example, "I presume that her jewellery is expensive. Based on
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my evidence, I might've seen some before, I'm presuming it's expensive. I don't know
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for sure, but I have a good idea. To assume implies less confidence, it means it's based
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on little or no evidence. "I can't believe you're here. I assumed you wouldn't come."
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I had no evidence for that, I just assumed it. I just supposed it. Now, a way that you
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can remember this is to say that to assume is to make an ass out of you and me. Ass-u-me,
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assume. I really like that one.
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And number 10, we have lonely and alone. Lonely and alone, they sound very similar, but they
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have very different meanings. Both are adjectives. Alone means without any other people. If you're
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alone, no one else is there. If you are lonely, you are unhappy because no one else is there.
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So alone has no emotion attached to it, but lonely does. An example, When I lived alone,
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I felt very lonely." Or, "I'm alone, but I'm not lonely."
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All right. That is it for today's lesson. I really hope you enjoyed it and that you
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learned something. If you want to complete the quiz, then sign up for my mailing list
11:35
and the PDF will be sent straight to your inbox. Don't forget to check out Skillshare.
11:40
The first 1000 of my students to click on the link in the description box will get a
11:45
free trial of premium Skillshare membership, and you can connect with me on all of my social
11:50
media. I've got my Facebook, my Instagram, my website, and my mailing list. I will see
12:03
you soon for another lesson. Muah.
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