20 Weird things ONLY British people do! (+ Free PDF & Quiz)

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2020-12-11・ 54494

English with Lucy channel


20 weird habits that British people thing are normal! How many of these can you relate to? Visit my NEW website here: https://englishwithlucy.co.uk/ - I hope you enjoy the free PDFs and pronunciation tool using my voice!! I think it's worth saying that this video is for entertainment purposes and contains many generalisations. It's a satirical take on the perceived quirks of British culture. I hope you enjoy it. I wanted to make a fun video before Christmas :) DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE EMAILS FROM LUCY? Sign up here: https://bit.ly/EmailsFromLucy Don't forget to turn on subtitles if you need them! This is how I generate my subtitles (you can get a $10 subtitle coupon too): https://www.rev.com/blog/coupon/?ref=lucy (affiliate) Visit my website for free PDFs and an interactive pronunciation tool! https://englishwithlucy.co.uk​ MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Personal Channel: http://bit.ly/LucyBella​​​ (I post subtitled vlogs of my life in the English countryside! Perfect for listening practice!) Instagram: @Lucy http://bit.ly/lucyinsta​​​​​​​​​​ My British English Pronunciation Course is now LIVE: https://englishwithlucy.co.uk/pronunciationcourse (use code YOUTUBE10 for a 10% discount!) Do you want to improve your pronunciation? I have launched my British English (Modern RP) pronunciation course! I’ll train you to read phonetic transcriptions, and produce each sound that comprises modern received pronunciation. I’ll also teach you how to implement the correct use of intonation, stress, rhythm, connected speech, and much more. We’ll compare similar sounds, and look at tricky topics like the glottal stop and the dark L. Technically, I need to mark this as an AD even though it is my own company so - AD :) Want to get a copy of my English Vocabulary Planners? Click here: https://shop.englishwithlucy.co.uk - The best offer is the 4-book bundle where you get 4 planners for the price of 3. This product is very limited - don't miss out. The English Plan will be shipped from early August, from me here in England to you across the world! We ship internationally! Watch my explainer video here: https://bit.ly/TheEnglishPlanVideo Practice speaking: Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy... (ad affiliate) Improve listening! Free Audible audiobook: https://goo.gl/LshaPp If you like my lessons, and would like to support me, you can buy me a coffee here: https://ko-fi.com/englishwithlucy FREE £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa (ad - affiliate) Email for business enquiries ONLY: [email protected]

Instruction

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00:10
Hello everyone. And welcome back to English with Lucy. Today, I'm going to talk to you
00:15
about 20 British quirks, lovely word, meaning peculiar aspects in someone's behaviour or
00:24
character. Essentially, I'm going to talk to you about some weird things that British
00:29
people tend to do. Huge generalisations are going to be made here. I would love for you
00:35
to let me know in the comments section where you are from, and if you relate to any of
00:41
these, or if it is the exact opposite where you are from. Before we get started, I would
00:46
like to thank the sponsor of today's video, myself. I have sponsored my own video. It's
00:53
not really a sponsor. I just want to let you know that I have launched my new website.
00:59
It is englishwithlucy.co.uk. I don't know how I came up with that domain. I am extremely
01:06
excited about this.
01:07
It's something that I've been working on for a long time. I've been a busy girl and I have
01:13
created an interactive pronunciation chart for you using my own voice. So you can go
01:19
on the website, englishwithlucy.co.uk, click on any phoneme and hear me pronounce it, and
01:29
also I pronounce a word containing that phoneme. You can have lots of fun making me repeatedly
01:35
say funny, sounding phonemes over and over again. Like, ah, ah, ah, ah, or you could
01:43
get a rhythm going with cha, cha, cha, cha. Okay. I'm going to stop, but I'm really proud
01:48
of it. You can also find the PDF which contains the transcript of this lesson with important
01:55
vocabulary. This is a great listening practise. I've also added subtitles to this video that
02:00
you can use. That's all there on the website as well. So click on the link or just go to
02:05
englishwithlucy.co.uk.
02:06
Okay. Now I've launched my website to all of you. Let's get started with the 20 weird
02:14
things that British people tend to do. Okay. So the first one is that we put carpet in
02:21
our bathrooms. Not everyone does this, but I am currently living in a house that has
02:28
a carpeted bathroom. And I will let you know that yes, we have had an overflow situation
02:35
with that toilet and in a carpeted bathroom, it wasn't pretty. So this is quite an old
02:41
fashioned thing to do. We don't tend to do this anymore, but if you go to a house that
02:46
hasn't been renovated or updated in a long while, or you go to the home of somebody who
02:51
is very traditional then yes, you might find carpet in your bathroom. We've got it here.
02:58
It wasn't my choice, but it's here. My grandparents have got carpeted bathrooms as well.
03:04
Number two is, "Waaay"? Okay. And this is something that we shout in a very, very specific
03:12
situation, which is this. When somebody smashes a glass in a pub, the whole pub should shout,
03:23
"Waaay." Sorry. I had to rerecord that. That was so loud. Now I worked as a waitress for
03:30
three years. I dropped a fair few glasses. We had to carry these drinks on tiny round
03:36
trays that you had to balance. I couldn't do that. So I've had my fair share of, "Waaays"
03:43
in my lifetime. Now my mother's best friend forgot where she was once. And she did the,
03:52
"Waaay" in Portugal. A restaurant in Portugal, some poor, poor waiter dropped a load of glasses.
04:00
They smashed everywhere and there was just my mom's best friend there on her own shouting,
04:07
"Waaay." The next one is number three, which is excitement over fireworks on Bonfire Night.
04:15
So on the 5th of November, all around the UK, we have bonfires. We let off fireworks
04:21
and we do this because it's the anniversary, the 5th of November of a failed attempt to
04:26
blow up to explode the Houses of Parliament. On this event we burn guys. And these are
04:34
dummy men used to represent the man who was going to blow up the Houses of Parliament.
04:41
He was called Guy Fawkes. So sometimes we call it Guy Fawkes Night as well. Now on this
04:46
night or on the evenings surrounding this night, depending when it falls, if it falls
04:50
on a Monday, then you might have it on the Saturday before, for example, people who have,
04:56
no experience or business dealing with explosives, get incredibly excited. They go to firework
05:03
shops, they do them in their garden, and it's just really dangerous. My dad always really
05:10
enjoyed setting up the fireworks and setting them off in a neighbor's garden.
05:15
And my mother was always absolutely petrified. She was so scared he was going to get hurt
05:21
and rightly so. And one day they played this terrible prank on my mother and all of the
05:26
other worried wives, they let off a load of fireworks and then they came screaming covered
05:33
with soot, with black ashes all over their face as if they had had the explosion in their
05:39
face. And the women went crazy and they were not best pleased to find out it was all a
05:45
joke. Number four, we think that a cup of tea will cure or help at least any bad situation.
05:54
And a lot of us genuinely believe this. When something bad happens, our first response
06:00
is, "Okay, I'll put the kettle on." If somebody told you some devastating news and you don't
06:06
know what to say, you can just say, "That's awful. Do you want a cup of tea?"
06:11
Number five is the phrase, Oh, go on then. Okay. Said like this, "Oh go on then." This
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is something that we say when we are offered something that we know we shouldn't have,
06:24
for example, a very unhealthy food or maybe a cigarette or a drink of alcohol. When somebody
06:31
offers you something naughty or considered to be naughty, "Go on then, go on then." I
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wonder if you have a similar phrase in your own language, I would love to hear it. Because
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I think that's just such a key phrase in our vocabulary. Number six, Colin, the Caterpillar
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Cake. Need I say more. Yes, I need to say more so that my viewers understand. Any British
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person watching this will understand Colin, the Caterpillar Cake. They will probably feel
07:03
excitement running through their veins. Okay? A Collin, the Caterpillar Cake is a long chocolate
07:12
roll. I think that's what you call it.
07:15
It's a roll of cake, covered in chocolate with the face of a caterpillar on the end.
07:20
And if it was your birthday at school, your mum would buy you a Colin the Caterpillar
07:24
Cake. It was very easy to slice and lots of slices for all of the children. And if it
07:30
was your birthday, you got to eat the face. I remember my first Colin, the Caterpillar
07:35
Cake. I remember being served the face of this cake, and I remember it being disgusting,
07:40
but I ate it anyway because it was my birthday and because I'd earned it and I'd spent the
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whole year watching everyone else eat their caterpillar faces. These are typically sold
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in Marks & Spencers, a shop here, food shop here, quite a posh food shop here as far as
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I'm aware. And if you ever go to a British person's birthday party, I really think you
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should bring one.
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It will make them so excited, probably. Number seven, something else we find ridiculously
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exciting, way more exciting than it should be, J2O's. I don't know if you have these
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in other countries, but they are a non alcoholic juice drink. Not juice, juice drink. That
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means it's not 100% juice. The most famous flavour is orange and passion fruit. But the
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thing is they came in glass bottles that were the same size as beer bottles. So when you're
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a child and you were at a party, an adult party, you could feel like an adult with a
08:40
similar beer bottle. Very exciting. I remember taking it a step too far when I was younger
08:46
and taking my parents beers bottles that were green, Stella Artois always and refilling
08:52
them with Apple juice and carrying that around with me and completely confused when my parents
08:57
were so angry with me and saying, "No, Lucy you don't do that. Don't do that."
09:03
We also had another drink called Schloer, which was alcohol free, like a sweet grape
09:09
juice, fizzy as well. And I felt like such an adult when I had a glass of Schloer at
09:14
Christmas. Do you have any drinks that you used to have as a child that made you feel
09:19
grown up? I bet there are. Number eight is the phrase to pop. Okay? Sounds a bit random.
09:29
But we use pop in many phrasal verbs and it's a very warm way of asking somebody to come
09:38
or go somewhere. Do you want me to pop over? Do you want me to come over? It implies a
09:44
short amount of time. Why don't we pop down the road for a coffee? Why don't we just quickly
09:48
go down the road for a coffee? I remember one of my Spanish students in London, they
09:53
were appearing for a British family and they were so confused by the word pop because you
09:59
can pop around, pop up, pop down, pop over, just treat it as come and go.
10:05
Number nine, British people like to base the entire country's economic state on the price
10:13
inflation of a frog shaped chocolate bar called a Freddo. Yes, you heard that correctly. We
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base our economics on a frog shaped chocolate bar called a Freddo. When we were young, Freddos
10:28
were known to be the most affordable chocolate bar. They were a little frog and they were
10:33
typically, I think 10 P when I was young, I remember being given a pound to spend on
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sweets at a party. I could have one big packet of sweets or I could have 10 Freddos. The
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logical answer is to go for all of the Freddos. However, every time I see the price of a Freddo
10:51
rise, I am outraged and the rest of the nation is too. I'm going to search now, current price
10:57
of Freddos. 25 P, 25 P. So what... That means I could have bought 10 and now I can only
11:20
buy four. That is outrageous.
11:26
Okay. Number 10, pigs in blankets, we get so excited about this particular food called
11:37
a pig in blankets. It is a little cocktail sausage wrapped in bacon. And typically we
11:43
only have them at Christmas. There's no reason for this. We could have them every Sunday,
11:48
but if you go to a pub and your Sunday roast comes with a pig in blanket or some pigs in
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blankets, it's the best roast ever. We absolutely love them. "Oh, you already have them at Christmas,
12:01
why is that?" Number 11 one of our most popular TV shows is a TV show of people watching TV
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shows. It's called Gogglebox. I imagine this concept has arrived in other countries now.
12:16
They basically film families, watching the TV highlights, and then they compile their
12:22
witty remarks and then we watched them. It's a very good programme. It's very metta. Number
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12 dog poop in Facebook groups.
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Okay. In the UK. And I imagine in lots of places in the world, we have Facebook Groups
12:38
for our local community. So I'm in quite a few of the surrounding villages and towns.
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And there is a new phenomenon and it is the people that are getting so frustrated with
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people not picking up their dog poop, especially if it's on someone's property or on their
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front lawn. People are taking to taking pictures of the dog poop and posting it in these community
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groups. I don't know about you, but I normally check my phone for the first time in the morning
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when I'm about to take my first bite of breakfast, normally porridge, and to have porridge approaching
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my mouth, opening my phone and seeing a massive dog poop, it's just not ideal. So now people
13:21
are rebelling against the dog poop posters and there is just, Oh, there's just huge civil
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unrest online at the moment.
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Those who want to shame the dog poop leavers and those who want to shame the dog poop posters.
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It's very complex. I hate dog poop, it's absolutely horrendous, but I also don't want to see it
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all over my Facebook Timeline. I've seen enough. We know it's a problem. Number 13, drinking
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in rounds. When we go on a night out with a group of friends, we drink in rounds, which
13:55
means if there are five of us, instead of everyone buying their individual drinks, one
14:01
person will buy five drinks and the next person will buy five drinks. I'm sure many of you
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are aware of this concept. I'm sure it has a different name where you're from, but the
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very British thing to do is to shout, "Whose round is it?" When you know exactly whose
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round it is, and you just are trying to make them actually by their round. Because there
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are a lots of people who will participate in rounds, wait till last and hope that they
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won't actually have to buy that round.
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Thus escaping with a lot of free drinks and a very full wallet. And it's very annoying.
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Now we can be considered quite passive aggressive. So instead of saying, "It's your round, go
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and buy your round," just shouting, "Whose round is it?" Is a much easier way to avoid
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confrontation. However, my fiance, he said at university, there was one guy who was so
14:54
bad at buying or paying for his fair share of drinks that they actually grabbed him,
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marched him to an ATM, a bank, took his card out and forced him to take out the money.
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Some people are adjust what we would call here, tight. If somebody's tight, they don't
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like spending a lot of money. Number 14 is we can't always be bothered to use an umbrella.
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It rains so often, and not unless it is absolutely pummeling it down, I didn't mind getting a
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bit wet.
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I remember when I was in Spain, the minute the first drop hit anyone's hair, they would
15:33
whip out their umbrella. Everyone had it. Everyone knew the weather. I just never knew
15:37
how people kept track of whether it was going to rain that day or not, but it was more of
15:42
a rare occasion there. And it's very, very common here. So I did use to walk into my
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classrooms, soaking wet sometimes just normal. Number 15, we don't put fridges in the eggs,
15:52
wrong. Number 15, we don't always put our eggs in the fridge. I don't know if this is
15:58
weird for you. I remember going abroad and seeing fridges in the eggs, fridges in the
16:05
eggs. I remember going abroad and seeing eggs in the fridges. I remember some fridges arriving
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with egg holders. I thought that was so weird. Now, I like a nice room temperature, egg.
16:16
Oh, yes.
16:17
Why does that sound like a nuendo? 16, this one goes without saying we are obsessed with
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the weather, even if it's so boring, "Oh, it's slightly grand windy today." We will
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tell you that, "Oh it's a bit grand windy. Isn't it?" It does change so much that it
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is quite entertaining. We've got, sometimes we don't have that much in our lives to talk
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about. So the weather is just a really good one to go for. Number 17 scone or scone. Okay.
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This is the conundrum. And actually there's a part two to this conundrum as well. That
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is a baked good, which I call a scone, but other people call it a scone. And there's
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a big fight, a big divide in the UK about whether it is a scone or a scone. I don't
17:05
want to get involved in that.
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I'm not going to say scone is wrong, but I do prefer scone. Scone [inaudible 00:17:01].
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The other part of this conundrum is the order in which you put toppings. Typically we serve
17:20
scones or scones with jam and clotted cream. They are absolutely to die for. If you come
17:28
to the UK, make sure you have an afternoon tea with scones or scones. Now I always put
17:35
clotted cream first, then jam. But some people will swear you have to put the jam first,
17:41
then the clotted cream. I'm not going to tell you, which is right.
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You're just going to have to try it out for yourself. But I think logistically cream first,
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then jam. Number 18. We are terrible at ending conversations. Honestly, this is the most
17:59
annoying thing ever. There is a huge culprit of this, and this is my fiance, Will. Typically,
18:06
when we want to end a conversation, we will say, "Right," and kind of, "I need to be heading
18:13
off." Or, "I must get a move on." Or, "I need to get going." But for some reason, some people
18:18
really struggle with this. And when you have two people that struggle with ending conversations
18:23
coming together, you could just go on for eternity. It's really, really troubling.
18:34
You all right?
18:36
Yeah. Could you hear that?
18:40
Yes.
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Come and say, hello. Admit to your problem. This is Will, don't worry about his face.
18:45
You know your problem. You're almost perfect.
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Is it on ending conversations?
18:49
It was ending conversations.
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Yeah, it's a tricky one.
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It's fine if you were talking to someone who can end the conversation, but it's when you
18:57
are with another person that also finds ending conversations difficult.
19:00
Well, it's nice to get out. Isn't it? [crosstalk 00:18:51]. It's really tough here for everyone.
19:05
Maybe to it.
19:06
All right. I'm almost done.
19:09
Cool.
19:10
Number 19, we really overuse the word, sorry. This was further solidified in my mind last
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night. We watched Bridget Jones and there was the scene where Mark Darcy or Colin Firth
19:22
and Hugh Grant were fighting and they were knocking over things on people's tables, in
19:26
a restaurant and they were still apologising. We just can't help it. I find myself apologising
19:33
for apologising too much.
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Number 20. The final weird thing that British people do is consume a lot of pre-made sandwiches.
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It's a bit of a random one, but there is something very exciting about going on a short car journey
19:51
and stopping off for lunch. And lunch will be a pre-made sandwich in a box. You can get
19:57
them from petrol stations or you can get them from supermarkets. I know Tesco does something
20:02
called a meal deal, where for a certain amount of money, you get a sandwich, a snack and
20:08
a drink, and people absolutely love it. And they try to get the most value from that meal
20:12
deal. They say, you can tell a lot about a person from what they choose for their meal
20:19
deal, but I've travelled to a couple of countries and I've never seen the sheer amount of options
20:26
for pre-made sandwiches that we have in the UK.
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It's crazy. Every flavour, every feeling so creative as well. Prawn is my favourite, Prawn
20:37
Mayonnaise. I absolutely love it. The Christmas range is in full swing at the moment. We have
20:44
turkey and stuffing sandwiches. Awesome. I saw a [reduct 00:20:34] La Roche sandwich
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the other day. I wouldn't say it's something I recommend. Actually, if you want to have
20:55
a British experience, when you come over to the UK, go to a petrol station, buy a sandwich,
21:02
then you will feel like a Brit, right? On that note, that's the end of today's lesson.
21:08
I have got the full transcript of this video with important vocabulary on my new website,
21:10
englishwithlucy.co.uk. I'll link it down below. Don't forget to check out the interactive
21:14
phonemic chart. Very, very excited about that. I can't wait for you to make me sound like
21:22
a robot. Don't forget to connect with me on all of my social media. I've got my Facebook,
21:30
my Instagram and my website and my email list as well. I will see you soon for another lesson,
21:36
mwah!
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